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Mortality from tetanus between 1990 and 2015: findings from the global burden of disease study 2015

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
81 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
218 Mendeley
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Title
Mortality from tetanus between 1990 and 2015: findings from the global burden of disease study 2015
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4111-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hmwe H. Kyu, John Everett Mumford, Jeffrey D. Stanaway, Ryan M. Barber, Jamie R. Hancock, Theo Vos, Christopher J. L. Murray, Mohsen Naghavi

Abstract

Although preventable, tetanus still claims tens of thousands of deaths each year. The patterns and distribution of mortality from tetanus have not been well characterized. We identified the global, regional, and national levels and trends of mortality from neonatal and non-neonatal tetanus based on the results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Data from vital registration, verbal autopsy studies and mortality surveillance data covering 12,534 site-years from 1980 to 2014 were used. Mortality from tetanus was estimated using the Cause of Death Ensemble modeling strategy. There were 56,743 (95% uncertainty interval (UI): 48,199 to 80,042) deaths due to tetanus in 2015; 19,937 (UI: 17,021 to 23,467) deaths occurred in neonates; and 36,806 (UI: 29,452 to 61,481) deaths occurred in older children and adults. Of the 19,937 neonatal tetanus deaths, 45% of deaths occurred in South Asia, and 44% in Sub-Saharan Africa. Of the 36,806 deaths after the neonatal period, 47% of deaths occurred in South Asia, 36% in sub-Saharan Africa, and 12% in Southeast Asia. Between 1990 and 2015, the global mortality rate due to neonatal tetanus dropped by 90% and that due to non-neonatal tetanus dropped by 81%. However, tetanus mortality rates were still high in a number of countries in 2015. The highest rates of neonatal tetanus mortality (more than 1,000 deaths per 100,000 population) were observed in Somalia, South Sudan, Afghanistan, and Kenya. The highest rates of mortality from tetanus after the neonatal period (more than 5 deaths per 100,000 population) were observed in Somalia, South Sudan, and Kenya. Though there have been tremendous strides globally in reducing the burden of tetanus, tens of thousands of unnecessary deaths from tetanus could be prevented each year by an already available inexpensive and effective vaccine. Availability of more high quality data could help narrow the uncertainty of tetanus mortality estimates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 218 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 218 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 38 17%
Student > Master 33 15%
Researcher 24 11%
Student > Postgraduate 19 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 7%
Other 38 17%
Unknown 50 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 77 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 4%
Social Sciences 7 3%
Other 35 16%
Unknown 59 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2021.
All research outputs
#1,076,530
of 21,194,338 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,158
of 13,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,232
of 391,672 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,194,338 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,729 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 391,672 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them