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Long-term effects of a web-based cancer aftercare intervention on moderate physical activity and vegetable consumption among early cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

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51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
264 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term effects of a web-based cancer aftercare intervention on moderate physical activity and vegetable consumption among early cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0474-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Iris M. Kanera, Roy A. Willems, Catherine A. W. Bolman, Ilse Mesters, Peter Verboon, Lilian Lechner

Abstract

The number of cancer survivors is growing. Negative physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer treatment can occur during survivorship. Following healthy lifestyle recommendations is beneficial to increase quality of life and to reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and comorbidities. To meet individual needs, web-based interventions can supply a large population of cancer survivors with easily accessible and personalized information. Evidence concerning the long-term effects of web-based cancer aftercare interventions on lifestyle outcomes is limited. The present study evaluates the 12-month effects of a fully automated web-based cancer aftercare intervention. We investigated whether the previously determined 6-month effects on moderate physical activity and vegetable intake were maintained over 12 months. Possible moderator effects of using specific intervention modules, gender, age, and education were also explored. A two-armed randomized controlled trial was conducted using online self-report questionnaires among survivors of various types of cancer (N = 462). The intervention group had access to the online intervention for 6 months, and the control group received access after 12-months. Multilevel linear regression analyses (complete cases and intention-to-treat) were conducted to explore 12- month effects. A significant intervention effect after 12 months was found for moderate physical activity (complete cases: B = 128.475, p = .010, d = .35; intention-to-treat: B = 129.473, p = .011). Age was the only significant moderator (p = .010), with the intervention being effective among participants aged younger than 57 years (B = 256.549, p = .000, d = .59). No significant intervention effect remained for vegetable consumption after 12 months (complete cases: B = 5.860, p = .121; intention-to-treat: B = 5.560, p = .132). The online cancer after care intervention is effective in increasing and maintaining moderate physical activity in the long term among early cancer survivors younger than 57 years. Short-term increases in vegetable consumption were not sustained in the long term. These findings indicate the value and potential of eHealth interventions for cancer survivors. Based on the study results, web-based self-management interventions could be recommended for younger cancer survivors (<57 years of age) as a possible method to increase physical activity. Dutch Trial Register NTR3375 . Registered 29 March 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 264 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 264 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 16%
Researcher 30 11%
Student > Bachelor 29 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 8%
Other 43 16%
Unknown 74 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 48 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 16%
Psychology 37 14%
Sports and Recreations 18 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Other 25 9%
Unknown 87 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2020.
All research outputs
#1,695,811
of 19,001,205 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#720
of 1,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,041
of 375,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#5
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,001,205 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,744 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,755 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.