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Monitoring training response in young Friesian dressage horses using two different standardised exercise tests (SETs)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, February 2017
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Title
Monitoring training response in young Friesian dressage horses using two different standardised exercise tests (SETs)
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-0969-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cornelis Marinus de Bruijn, Willem Houterman, Margreet Ploeg, Bart Ducro, Berit Boshuizen, Klaartje Goethals, Elisabeth-Lidwien Verdegaal, Catherine Delesalle

Abstract

Most Friesian horses reach their anaerobic threshold during a standardized exercise test (SET) which requires lower intensity exercise than daily routine training. to study strengths and weaknesses of an alternative SET-protocol. Two different SETs (SETA and SETB) were applied during a 2 month training period of 9 young Friesian dressage horses. SETB alternated short episodes of canter with trot and walk, lacking long episodes of cantering, as applied in SETA. Following parameters were monitored: blood lactic acid (BLA) after cantering, average heart rate (HR) in trot and maximum HR in canter. HR and BLA of SETA and SETB were analyzed using a paired two-sided T-test and Spearman Correlation-coefficient (p* < 0.05). BLA after cantering was significantly higher in SETA compared to SETB and maximum HR in canter was significantly higher in SETA compared to SETB. The majority of horses showed a significant training response based upon longitudinal follow-up of BLA. Horses with the lowest fitness at start, displayed the largest training response. BLA was significantly lower in week 8 compared to week 0, in both SETA and SETB. A significantly decreased BLA level after cantering was noticeable in week 6 in SETA, whereas in SETB only as of week 8. In SETA a very strong correlation for BLA and average HR at trot was found throughout the entire training period, not for canter. Young Friesian horses do reach their anaerobic threshold during a SET which requires lower intensity than daily routine training. Therefore close monitoring throughout training is warranted. Longitudinal follow up of BLA and not of HR is suitable to assess training response. In the current study, horses that started with the lowest fitness level, showed the largest training response. During training monitoring HR in trot rather than in canter is advised. SETB is best suited as a template for daily training in the aerobic window.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 20%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 22 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 16%
Sports and Recreations 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2017.
All research outputs
#15,443,875
of 22,953,506 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#1,425
of 3,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#261,141
of 428,391 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#30
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,953,506 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,058 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 428,391 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.