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Plastome phylogeny and early diversification of Brassicaceae

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, February 2017
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Title
Plastome phylogeny and early diversification of Brassicaceae
Published in
BMC Genomics, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-3555-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xinyi Guo, Jianquan Liu, Guoqian Hao, Lei Zhang, Kangshan Mao, Xiaojuan Wang, Dan Zhang, Tao Ma, Quanjun Hu, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz, Marcus A. Koch

Abstract

The family Brassicaceae encompasses diverse species, many of which have high scientific and economic importance. Early diversifications and phylogenetic relationships between major lineages or clades remain unclear. Here we re-investigate Brassicaceae phylogeny with complete plastomes from 51 species representing all four lineages or 5 of 6 major clades (A, B, C, E and F) as identified in earlier studies. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses using a partitioned supermatrix of 77 protein coding genes resulted in nearly identical tree topologies exemplified by highly supported relationships between clades. All four lineages were well identified and interrelationships between them were resolved. The previously defined Clade C was found to be paraphyletic (the genus Megadenia formed a separate lineage), while the remaining clades were monophyletic. Clade E (lineage III) was sister to clades B + C rather than to all core Brassicaceae (clades A + B + C or lineages I + II), as suggested by a previous transcriptome study. Molecular dating based on plastome phylogeny supported the origin of major lineages or clades between late Oligocene and early Miocene, and the following radiative diversification across the family took place within a short timescale. In addition, gene losses in the plastomes occurred multiple times during the evolutionary diversification of the family. Plastome phylogeny illustrates the early diversification of cruciferous species. This phylogeny will facilitate our further understanding of evolution and adaptation of numerous species in the model family Brassicaceae.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 98 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 19%
Student > Master 14 14%
Researcher 13 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 18 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 23%
Environmental Science 2 2%
Chemistry 2 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 20 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2017.
All research outputs
#15,346,994
of 17,363,630 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#8,003
of 9,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,485
of 267,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#13
of 15 outputs
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