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Regional and temporal trends in blood mercury concentrations and fish consumption in women of child bearing Age in the united states using NHANES data from 1999–2010

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, February 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
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Title
Regional and temporal trends in blood mercury concentrations and fish consumption in women of child bearing Age in the united states using NHANES data from 1999–2010
Published in
Environmental Health, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12940-017-0218-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leanne K. Cusack, Ellen Smit, Molly L. Kile, Anna K. Harding

Abstract

The primary route of exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), a known developmental neurotoxicant, is from ingestion of seafood. Since 2004, women of reproductive age in the U.S. have been urged to eat fish and shellfish as part of a healthy diet while selecting species that contain lower levels MeHg. Yet few studies have examined trends in MeHg exposure and fish consumption over time in this group of women with respect to their geographical location in the U.S. Data from six consecutive cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2010 (n = 9597) were used to determine trends in blood mercury for women aged 16-49 residing in different regions in the US, and according to age, race/ethnicity, income level, and fish consumption using geographic variables. Overall, mean blood mercury concentrations differed across survey cycles and mercury concentrations were lower in 2009-2010 compared to 1999-2000. There were regional patterns in fish consumption and blood Hg concentrations with women living in coastal regions having the highest fish consumption in the past 30 days and the highest blood Hg levels compared to women residing inland. On average, U.S. women of reproductive age were consuming more fish and blood mercury levels were lower in 2009-2010 compared to 1999-2000. However, efforts to encourage healthy fish consumption may need to be tailored to different regions in the U.S. given the observed spatial variability in blood mercury levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Israel 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 34 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Lecturer 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 8 22%
Unknown 9 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 17%
Environmental Science 4 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 13 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 112. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2017.
All research outputs
#188,800
of 15,920,152 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#59
of 1,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,454
of 262,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,920,152 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,252 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them