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Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking using a non-rigid, elastic image registration algorithm: assessment of variability in a real-life clinical setting

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), February 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

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7 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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45 Dimensions

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking using a non-rigid, elastic image registration algorithm: assessment of variability in a real-life clinical setting
Published in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12968-017-0333-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro Morais, Alberto Marchi, Julie A. Bogaert, Tom Dresselaers, Brecht Heyde, Jan D’hooge, Jan Bogaert

Abstract

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) is a promising technique for quantification of myocardial strain from steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine images. We sought to determine the variability of CMR-FT using a non-rigid elastic registration algorithm recently available in a commercial software package (Segment, Medviso) in a real-life clinical setting. Firstly, we studied the variability in a healthy volunteer who underwent 10 CMR studies over five consecutive days. Secondly, 10 patients were selected from our CMR database yielding normal findings (normal group). Finally, we prospectively studied 10 patients with known or suspected myocardial pathology referred for further investigation to CMR (patient group). In the patient group a second study was performed respecting an interval of 30 min between studies. All studies were manually segmented at the end-diastolic phase by three observers. In all subjects left ventricular (LV) circumferential and radial strain were calculated in the short-axis direction (EccSAX and ErrSAX, respectively) and longitudinal strain in the long-axis direction (EllLAX). The level of CMR experience of the observers was 2 weeks, 6 months and >20 years. Mean contouring time was 7 ± 1 min, mean FT calculation time 13 ± 2 min. Intra- and inter-observer variability was good to excellent with an coefficient of reproducibility (CR) ranging 1.6% to 11.5%, and 1.7% to 16.0%, respectively and an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) ranging 0.89 to 1.00 and 0.74 to 0.99, respectively. Variability considerably increased in the test-retest setting with a CR ranging 4.2% to 29.1% and an ICC ranging 0.66 to 0.95 in the patient group. Variability was not influenced by level of expertise of the observers. Neither did the presence of myocardial pathology at CMR negatively impact variability. However, compared to global myocardial strain, segmental myocardial strain variability increased with a factor 2-3, in particular for the basal and apical short-axis slices. CMR-FT using non-rigid, elastic registration is a reproducible approach for strain analysis in patients routinely scheduled for CMR, and is not influenced by the level of training. However, further improvement is needed to reliably depict small variations in segmental myocardial strain.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 14 21%
Student > Master 10 15%
Student > Postgraduate 8 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 16 24%
Unknown 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 57%
Engineering 10 15%
Computer Science 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2017.
All research outputs
#5,254,985
of 19,140,651 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#456
of 1,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,074
of 271,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,140,651 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,151 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,383 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them