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The association between graduated driver licensing laws and travel behaviors among adolescents: an analysis of US National Household Travel Surveys

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
The association between graduated driver licensing laws and travel behaviors among adolescents: an analysis of US National Household Travel Surveys
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3206-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Motao Zhu, Peter Cummings, Songzhu Zhao, Thomas Rice

Abstract

Young novice drivers have crash rates higher than any other age group. To address this problem, graduated driver licensing (GDL) laws have been implemented in the United States to require an extended learner permit phase, and create night time driving or passenger restrictions for adolescent drivers. GDL allows adolescents to gain experience driving under low-risk conditions with the aim of reducing crashes. The restricted driving might increase riding with parents or on buses, which might be safer, or walking or biking, which might be more dangerous. We examined whether GDL increases non-driver travels, and whether it reduces total travels combining drivers and non-drivers. We used data from the US National Household Travel Survey for the years 1995-1996, 2001-2002, and 2008-2009 to estimate the adjusted ratio for the number of trips and trip kilometers made by persons exposed to a GDL law, compared with those not exposed. Adolescents aged 16 years had fewer trips and kilometers as drivers when exposed to a GDL law: ratio 0.84 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.71, 1.00) for trips; 0.79 (0.63, 0.98) for kilometers. For adolescents aged 17 years, the trip ratio was 0.94 (0.83, 1.07) and the kilometers ratio 0.80 (0.63, 1.03). There was little association between GDL laws and trips or kilometers traveled by other methods: ratio 1.03 for trips and 1.00 for kilometers for age 16 years, 0.94 for trips and 1.07 for kilometers for age 17. If these associations are causal, GDL laws reduced driving kilometers by about 20 % for 16 and 17 year olds, and reduced the number of driving trips by 16 % among 16 year olds. GDL laws showed little relationship with trips by other methods.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 17%
Researcher 5 14%
Other 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 13 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Social Sciences 4 11%
Psychology 2 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 16 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2017.
All research outputs
#2,407,067
of 9,077,263 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,297
of 7,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,190
of 254,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#101
of 190 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,077,263 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,372 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 190 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.