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The societal costs of dementia in Sweden 2012 – relevance and methodological challenges in valuing informal care

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
The societal costs of dementia in Sweden 2012 – relevance and methodological challenges in valuing informal care
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13195-016-0215-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Wimo, Linus Jönsson, Laura Fratiglioni, Per Olof Sandman, Anders Gustavsson, Anders Sköldunger, Lennarth Johansson

Abstract

In this study, we sought to estimate the societal cost of illness in dementia in Sweden in 2012 using different costing approaches to highlight methodological issues. We conducted a prevalence-based cost-of-illness study with a societal perspective. The societal costs of dementia in Sweden in 2012 were SEK 62.9 billion (approximately €7.2 billion, approximately US$9.0 billion) or SEK 398,000 per person with dementia (approximately €45,000, approximately US$57,000). By far the most important cost item is the cost of institutional care: about 60% of the costs. In the sensitivity analysis, different quantification and costing approaches for informal care resulted in a great variation in the total societal cost, ranging from SEK 60 billion (€6.8 billion, US$8.6 billion) to SEK 124 billion (€14.1 billion, US$17.8 billion). The societal costs of dementia are very high. The cost per person with dementia has decreased somewhat, mainly because of de-institutionalisation. The majority of the costs occur in the social care sector, but the costing of informal care is crucial for the cost estimates.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 10 24%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#6,442,451
of 19,862,278 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#861
of 1,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,673
of 273,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,862,278 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,022 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.4. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them