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Evaluation of MLVA for epidemiological typing and outbreak detection of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in Sweden

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, January 2017
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Title
Evaluation of MLVA for epidemiological typing and outbreak detection of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in Sweden
Published in
BMC Microbiology, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0922-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa Helldal, Nahid Karami, Christina Welinder-Olsson, Edward R. B. Moore, Christina Åhren

Abstract

To identify the spread of nosocomial infections and halt outbreak development caused by Escherichia coli that carry multiple antibiotic resistance factors, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases, is becoming demanding challenges due to the rapid global increase and constant and increasing influx of these bacteria from the community to the hospital setting. Our aim was to assess a reliable and rapid typing protocol for ESBL-E. coli, with the primary focus to screen for possible clonal relatedness between isolates. All clinical ESBL-E. coli isolates, collected from hospitals (n = 63) and the community (n = 41), within a single geographical region over a 6 months period, were included, as well as clinical isolates from a polyclonal outbreak (ST131, n = 9, and ST1444, n = 3). The sporadic cases represented 36 STs, of which eight STs dominated i.e. ST131 (n = 33 isolates), ST648 (n = 10), ST38 (n = 9), ST12 and 69 (each n = 4), ST 167, 405 and 372 (each n = 3). The efficacy of multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was evaluated using three, seven or ten loci, in comparison with that of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST). MLVA detected 39, 55 and 60 distinct types, respectively, using three (GECM-3), seven (GECM-7) or ten (GECM-10) loci. For GECM-7 and -10, 26 STs included one type and eleven STs each included several types, the corresponding numbers for GECM-3 were 29 and 8. The highest numbers were seen for ST131 (7,7 and 8 types, respectively), ST38 (5,5,8) and ST648 (4,5,5). Good concordance was observed with PFGE and GECM-7 and -10, despite fewer types being identified with MLVA; 78 as compared to 55 and 60 types. The lower discriminatory power of MLVA was primarily seen within the O25b-ST131 lineage (n = 34) and its H30-Rx subclone (n = 21). Epidemiologically unrelated O25b-ST131 isolates were clustered with O25b-ST131 outbreak isolates by MLVA, whereas the ST1444 outbreak isolates were accurately distinguished from unrelated isolates. MLVA, even when using only three loci, represents an easy initial typing tool for epidemiological screening of ESBL-E. coli. For the ST131-O25b linage, complementary methods may be needed to obtain sufficient resolution.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Researcher 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 28%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Unknown 11 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,934,678
of 9,081,658 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#748
of 1,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,219
of 254,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#29
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,081,658 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,446 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.