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Effects of a community-based salt reduction program in a regional Australian population

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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25 Dimensions

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mendeley
64 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of a community-based salt reduction program in a regional Australian population
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3064-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mary-Anne Land, Jason H. Y. Wu, Adriana Selwyn, Michelle Crino, Mark Woodward, John Chalmers, Jacqui Webster, Caryl Nowson, Paul Jeffery, Wayne Smith, Victoria Flood, Bruce Neal

Abstract

Salt reduction is a public health priority but there are few studies testing the efficacy of plausible salt reduction programs. A multi-faceted, community-based salt reduction program using the Communication for Behavioral Impact framework was implemented in Lithgow, Australia. Single 24-h urine samples were obtained from 419 individuals at baseline (2011) and from 572 at follow-up (2014). Information about knowledge and behaviors relating to salt was also collected. Survey participants were on average 56 years old and 58 % female. Mean salt intake estimated from 24-h urine samples fell from 8.8 g/day (SD = 3.6 g/day) in 2011 to 8.0 (3.6) g/day in 2014 (-0.80, 95 % confidence interval -1.2 to -0.3;p < 0.001). There were significant increases in the proportion of participants that knew the recommended upper limit of salt intake (18 % vs. 29 %; p < 0.001), knew the importance of salt reduction (64 % vs. 78 %; p < 0.001) and reported changing their behaviors to reduce their salt intake by using spices (5 % vs. 28 %; p < 0.001) and avoiding eating out (21 % vs. 34 %; p < 0.001). However, the proportions that checked food labels (30 % vs. 25 %; p = 0.02) fell, as did the numbers avoiding processed foods (44 % vs. 35 %; p = 0.006). Twenty-six percent reported using salt substitute at the end of the intervention period and 90 % had heard about the program. Findings were robust to multivariable adjustment. Implementation of this multi-faceted community-based program was associated with a ~10 % reduction in salt consumption in an Australian regional town. These findings highlight the potential of well-designed health promotion programs to compliment other population-based strategies to bring about much-needed reductions in salt consumption. NCT02105727 .

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 31%
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Other 5 8%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Psychology 3 5%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2012.
All research outputs
#1,441,424
of 8,017,459 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,995
of 6,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,993
of 234,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#58
of 167 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,017,459 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,887 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,257 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 167 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.