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Perceived quality of life among Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV coinfected migrant male-workers in Northwest Ethiopia: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2017
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2 tweeters

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Title
Perceived quality of life among Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV coinfected migrant male-workers in Northwest Ethiopia: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4132-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mekuriaw Alemayehu, Mamo Wubshet, Nebiyu Mesfin, Abebaw Gebayehu

Abstract

There is paucity of data on quality of life as a dimension of treatment outcome among Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV coinfected patients. This study sought to explore perceived quality of life among Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV coinfected male migrant workers in Northwest Ethiopia. Twenty Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV coinfected study participants took part in the in-depth interviews at Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV treatment centers. Ten participants were on antiretroviral treatment (ART) and the remaining 10 have not yet started ART. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and translated for analysis. Data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis using Open Code software version 3.4. Participants reported on four aspects of quality of life: liveability of the environment, utility of life, life ability of a person and appreciation of life. Respondents living environment, therapeutic side effects of Visceral Leishmaniasis drugs, poverty and stigma negatively affected their quality of life. On the contrary, good treatment response and financial security were reported to positively affect their quality of life. Challenges related to the living environment, financial limitations and sub-optimal response of Visceral Leishmaniasis drug and relapse of Visceral Leishmaniasis disease are factors most negatively affecting the quality of life of Visceral Leishmaniasis and HIV coinfected patients. Micro-financing and other socio-economical support programs should be launched to assist the unemployed males migrating to Visceral Leishmaniasis endemic and relatively higher HIV prevalent areas to work as daily laborers. HIV prevention programs in HIV positive-living counseling programs should target such high risk migrant workers in the endemic areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 18 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Social Sciences 8 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 20 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2017.
All research outputs
#11,343,531
of 14,308,102 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#8,472
of 9,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,091
of 259,181 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,308,102 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,851 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,181 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them