↓ Skip to main content

Insomnia severity and its relationship with demographics, pain features, anxiety, and depression in older adults with and without pain: cross-sectional population-based results from the PainS65…

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of General Psychiatry, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Insomnia severity and its relationship with demographics, pain features, anxiety, and depression in older adults with and without pain: cross-sectional population-based results from the PainS65+ cohort
Published in
Annals of General Psychiatry, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12991-017-0137-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elena Dragioti, Lars-Åke Levin, Lars Bernfort, Britt Larsson, Björn Gerdle

Abstract

Insomnia is a major cause of concern in the elderly with and without pain. This study set out to examine the insomnia and its correlates in a large sample of community adults aged ≥65 years. A cross-sectional postal survey was completed by 6205 older individuals (53.8% women; mean age = 76.2 years; SD = 7.5). The participants also completed the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and questionnaires assessing pain intensity, pain spreading, anxiety, depression, and basic demographic information. The sample was divided into three groups based on the presence and duration of pain: chronic pain (CP; n = 2790), subacute pain (SP; n = 510), and no pain (NP; n = 2905). A proportion of each of the groups had an ISI score of 15 or greater (i.e., clinical insomnia): CP = 24.6%; SP = 21.3%; and NP = 13.0%. The average scores of ISI differed significantly among CP, SP, and NP groups (p < 0.001). Stratified regression analyses showed that pain intensity, pain spreading, anxiety, and depression were independently related to insomnia in the CP group. Anxiety and depression were independently related to insomnia in the SP group, but only anxiety was significantly associated with insomnia in the NP group. Age and sex were not associated with insomnia. This study confirms that insomnia is not associated with chronological aging per se within the elderly population. Although the possible associations of insomnia with pain are complex, ensuing from pain intensity, pain spreading, anxiety, and depression, our results highlighted that anxiety was more strongly associated with insomnia in all groups than the depression and pain characteristics. Therapeutic plans should consider these relations during the course of pain, and a comprehensive assessment including both pain and psychological features is essential when older people are seeking primary health care for insomnia complaints.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 28%
Psychology 15 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Neuroscience 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 14 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,430,050
of 9,153,782 outputs
Outputs from Annals of General Psychiatry
#147
of 286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,693
of 255,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of General Psychiatry
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,153,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 286 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,089 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.