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Dementia in the oldest old: a multi-factorial and growing public health issue

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
130 Mendeley
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Title
Dementia in the oldest old: a multi-factorial and growing public health issue
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/alzrt181
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raquel C Gardner, Victor Valcour, Kristine Yaffe

Abstract

The population of oldest old, or people aged 85 and older, is growing rapidly. A better understanding of dementia in this population is thus of increasing national and global importance. In this review, we describe the major epidemiological studies, prevalence, clinical presentation, neuropathological and imaging features, risk factors, and treatment of dementia in the oldest old. Prevalence estimates for dementia among those aged 85+ ranges from 18 to 38%. The most common clinical syndromes are Alzheimer's dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementia from multiple etiologies. The rate of progression appears to be slower than in the younger old. Single neuropathological entities such as Alzheimer's dementia and Lewy body pathology appear to have declining relevance to cognitive decline, while mixed pathology with Alzheimer's disease, vascular disease (especially cortical microinfarcts), and hippocampal sclerosis appear to have increasing relevance. Neuroimaging data are sparse. Risk factors for dementia in the oldest old include a low level of education, poor mid-life general health, low level of physical activity, depression, and delirium, whereas apolipoprotein E genotype, late-life hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and elevated peripheral inflammatory markers appear to have less relevance. Treatment approaches require further study, but the oldest old may be more prone to negative side effects compared with younger patients and targeted therapies may be less efficacious since single pathologies are less frequent. We also highlight the limitations and challenges of research in this area, including the difficulty of defining functional decline, a necessary component for a dementia diagnosis, the lack of normative neuropsychological data, and other shortcomings inherent in existing diagnostic criteria. In summary, our understanding of dementia in the oldest old has advanced dramatically in recent years, but more research is needed, particularly among varied racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups, and with respect to biomarkers such as neuroimaging, modifiable risk factors, and therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 130 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 124 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 15%
Student > Master 16 12%
Researcher 15 12%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Student > Postgraduate 14 11%
Other 28 22%
Unknown 23 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 32%
Psychology 13 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 8%
Neuroscience 10 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 33 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2021.
All research outputs
#5,228,049
of 21,467,161 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#886
of 1,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,363
of 175,907 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,467,161 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,110 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,907 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.