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Effect of malaria infection on hematological profiles of people living with human immunodeficiency virus in Gambella, southwest Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Hematology, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of malaria infection on hematological profiles of people living with human immunodeficiency virus in Gambella, southwest Ethiopia
Published in
BMC Hematology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12878-017-0072-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tsion Sahle, Tilahun Yemane, Lealem Gedefaw

Abstract

Malaria and human immunodeficiency virus are the two most devastating global health problems causing more than two million deaths each year. Hematological abnormalities such as anemia, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia are the common complications in malaria and HIV co-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of malaria infection on hematological profiles of people living with HIV attending Gambella Hospital ART clinic, Southwestern Ethiopia. To determine the effect of malaria infection on hematological profiles of people living with HIV attending Gambella Hospital ART clinic, Southwestern Ethiopia. A facility based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from May 25 to November 11, 2014 in Gambella Hospital. A total of 172 adult people living with HIV (86 malaria infected and 86 malaria non-infected) participants were included in the study. Demographic, anthropometric and clinical data were collected. Venous blood samples and stool specimen were collected for laboratory analysis. Microscopic examination of peripheral blood films was done for detection of malaria parasites. Descriptive statistics, student T- test, bivariable and multivariable analyses were performed using SPSS V-20. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. A total of 172 adult people living with HIV were included in the study. The prevalence of anemia, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia in malaria and HIV co-infected participants were 60.5%, 59.3%, and 43.0%, respectively. Resident (AOR: 4.67; 95% CI: 1.44, 15.14), malaria infection (AOR: 2.42; 95% CI: 1.16, 5.04) and CD4  (+) count were predictors for anemia. A predictor for thrombocytopenia was malaria infection (AOR: 9.79; 95% CI: 4.33, 22.17). Malaria parasitic density (AOR: 0.13; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.57) and CD4  (+) count (AOR: 4.77; 95% CI: 1.23, 18.45) were predictors of leucopenia. Findings suggest that the prevalence of anemia and thrombocytopenia were significantly higher in the malaria and HIV coinfected participants than the HIV mono-infected participants. Mean values of hematological profiles were significantly different in the two groups. Future prospective studies with larger sample size from other settings are needed to substantiate the findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 21%
Researcher 5 18%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 13 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,102,958
of 11,370,641 outputs
Outputs from BMC Hematology
#48
of 74 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,986
of 258,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Hematology
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,370,641 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,708 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.