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Soldiers’ load carriage performance in high mountains: a physiological study

Overview of attention for article published in Military Medical Research, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Soldiers’ load carriage performance in high mountains: a physiological study
Published in
Military Medical Research, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40779-017-0113-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tirthankar Chatterjee, Debojyoti Bhattacharyya, Anilendu Pramanik, Madhusudan Pal, Deepti Majumdar, Dhurjati Majumdar

Abstract

The present study was designed to evaluate load carriage performance at extremely high altitudes with different loads and walking speeds in terms of physiological evaluation. The degree of maximum oxygen consumption changes at high altitudes was also examined. Twelve Indian Army soldiers were acclimatized at altitudes of 3,505 m and 4,300 m. They walked for 10 minutes on a motorized treadmill at 2.5 km/h and 3.5 km/h speeds during carrying no loads and three magnitudes of load (10.7 kg, 21.4kg, 30 kg) at both altitudes. Physiological parameters such as oxygen consumption, energy expenditure, heart rate, and ventilation were recorded for each breath using a gas analyzer. The rating of perceived exertion was also noted after each load carriage session. Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured at sea level and the two high altitudes, and respective relative workloads (% of VO2max) were calculated from oxygen consumption. Repeated measure ANOVA was applied to reveal the significant effects of the independent variables. The participants had significant reductions in VO2max with rising altitude. Marked increases in almost all physiological parameters were observed with increasing load, altitude, and speed. The soldiers expressed heavy perceived exertion levels with higher loads at 3.5 km/h at the two high altitudes. Considering the physiological responses, expressions of perceived exertion and changes in relative work load at both of the high altitudes Indian soldiers are advised to walk slowly with adequate rest in between their schedules and to carry not more than 32% of their body weight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 25%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 17 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 6 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Engineering 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 17 26%
Unknown 25 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,066,378
of 9,176,636 outputs
Outputs from Military Medical Research
#26
of 77 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,955
of 254,149 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Military Medical Research
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,176,636 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,149 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.