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Preoperative cognitive-behavioural intervention improves in-hospital mobilisation and analgesic use for lumbar spinal fusion patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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221 Mendeley
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Title
Preoperative cognitive-behavioural intervention improves in-hospital mobilisation and analgesic use for lumbar spinal fusion patients
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1078-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nanna Rolving, Claus Vinther Nielsen, Finn Bjarke Christensen, Randi Holm, Cody Eric Bünger, Lisa Gregersen Oestergaard

Abstract

Catastrophic thinking and fear-avoidance belief are negatively influencing severe acute pain following surgery causing delayed ambulation and discharge. We aimed to examine if a preoperative intervention of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) could influence the early postsurgical outcome following lumbar spinal fusion surgery (LSF). Ninety patients undergoing LSF due to degenerative spinal disorders were randomly allocated to either the CBT group or the control group. Both groups received surgery and postoperative rehabilitation. In addition, the CBT group received a preoperative intervention focussed on pain coping using a CBT approach. Primary outcome was back pain during the first week (0-10 scale). Secondary outcomes were mobility, analgesic consumption, and length of hospitalisation. Data were retrieved using self-report questionnaires, assessments made by physical therapists and from medical records. No difference between the groups' self-reported back pain (p = 0.76) was detected. Independent mobility was reached by a significantly larger number of patients in the CBT group than the control group during the first three postoperative days. Analgesic consumption tended to be lower in the CBT group, whereas length of hospitalisation was unaffected by the CBT intervention. Participation in a preoperative CBT intervention appeared to facilitate mobility in the acute postoperative phase, despite equally high levels of self-reported acute postsurgical pain in the two groups, and a slightly lower intake of rescue analgesics in the CBT group. This may reflect an overall improved ability to cope with pain following participation in the preoperative CBT intervention. The study was approved by the Danish Protection Agency (2011-41-5899) and the Ethics Committee of the Central Denmark Region (M-20110047). The trial was registered in Current Controlled Trials ( ISRCTN42281022 ).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 219 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 73 33%
Student > Master 31 14%
Researcher 18 8%
Student > Bachelor 15 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 6%
Other 34 15%
Unknown 36 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 73 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 43 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 16%
Psychology 9 4%
Neuroscience 4 2%
Other 11 5%
Unknown 46 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2021.
All research outputs
#11,358,515
of 19,898,358 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,619
of 3,578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,622
of 273,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,898,358 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,578 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,452 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them