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Weight-loss and exercise for communities with arthritis in North Carolina (we-can): design and rationale of a pragmatic, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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215 Mendeley
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Title
Weight-loss and exercise for communities with arthritis in North Carolina (we-can): design and rationale of a pragmatic, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1441-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen P. Messier, Leigh F. Callahan, Daniel P. Beavers, Kate Queen, Shannon L. Mihalko, Gary D. Miller, Elena Losina, Jeffrey N. Katz, Richard F. Loeser, Sara A. Quandt, Paul DeVita, David J. Hunter, Mary F. Lyles, Jovita Newman, Betsy Hackney, Joanne M. Jordan

Abstract

Recently, we determined that in a rigorously monitored environment an intensive diet-induced weight loss of 10% combined with exercise was significantly more effective at reducing pain in men and women with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) than either intervention alone. Compared to previous long-term weight loss and exercise trials of knee OA, our intensive diet-induced weight loss and exercise intervention was twice as effective at reducing pain intensity. Whether these results can be generalized to less intensively monitored cohorts is unknown. Thus, the policy relevant and clinically important question is: Can we adapt this successful solution to a pervasive public health problem in real-world clinical and community settings? This study aims to develop a systematic, practical, cost-effective diet-induced weight loss and exercise intervention implemented in community settings and to determine its effectiveness in reducing pain and improving other clinical outcomes in persons with knee OA. This is a Phase III, pragmatic, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Participants will include 820 ambulatory, community-dwelling, overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 27 kg/m(2)) men and women aged ≥ 50 years who meet the American College of Rheumatology clinical criteria for knee OA. The primary aim is to determine whether a community-based 18-month diet-induced weight loss and exercise intervention based on social cognitive theory and implemented in three North Carolina counties with diverse residential (from urban to rural) and socioeconomic composition significantly decreases knee pain in overweight and obese adults with knee OA relative to a nutrition and health attention control group. Secondary aims will determine whether this intervention improves self-reported function, health-related quality of life, mobility, and is cost-effective. Many physicians who treat people with knee OA have no practical means to implement weight loss and exercise treatments as recommended by numerous OA treatment guidelines. This study will establish the effectiveness of a community program that will serve as a blueprint and exemplar for clinicians and public health officials in urban and rural communities to implement a diet-induced weight loss and exercise program designed to reduce knee pain and improve other clinical outcomes in overweight and obese adults with knee OA. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02577549 October 12, 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 215 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 16%
Student > Bachelor 29 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 8%
Researcher 15 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 7%
Other 32 15%
Unknown 71 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 16%
Sports and Recreations 16 7%
Psychology 9 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Other 28 13%
Unknown 84 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2022.
All research outputs
#5,917,473
of 21,786,000 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,129
of 3,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,095
of 277,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,786,000 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,877 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,338 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them