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Thrombelastography and tromboelastometry in assessing coagulopathy in trauma

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, January 2009
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Title
Thrombelastography and tromboelastometry in assessing coagulopathy in trauma
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1757-7241-17-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pär I Johansson, Trine Stissing, Louise Bochsen, Sisse R Ostrowski

Abstract

Death due to trauma is the leading cause of lost life years worldwide, with haemorrhage being responsible for 30-40% of trauma mortality and accounting for almost 50% of the deaths the initial 24 h. On admission, 25-35% of trauma patients present with coagulopathy, which is associated with a several-fold increase in morbidity and mortality. The recent introduction of haemostatic control resuscitation along with emerging understanding of acute post-traumatic coagulability, are important means to improve therapy and outcome in exsanguinating trauma patients. This change in therapy has emphasized the urgent need for adequate haemostatic assays to monitor traumatic coagulopathy and guide therapy. Based on the cell-based model of haemostasis, there is emerging consensus that plasma-based routine coagulation tests (RCoT), like prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), are inappropriate for monitoring coagulopathy and guide therapy in trauma. The necessity to analyze whole blood to accurately identify relevant coagulopathies, has led to a revival of the interest in viscoelastic haemostatic assays (VHA) such as Thromboelastography (TEG) and Rotation Thromboelastometry (ROTEM). Clinical studies including about 5000 surgical and/or trauma patients have reported on the benefit of using the VHA as compared to plasma-based assays, to identify coagulopathy and guide therapy. This article reviews the basic principles of VHA, the correlation between the VHA whole blood clot formation in accordance with the cell-based model of haemostasis, the current use of VHA-guided therapy in trauma and massive transfusion (haemostatic control resuscitation), limitations of VHA and future perspectives of this assay in trauma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
India 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 170 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 15%
Student > Postgraduate 24 13%
Other 20 11%
Student > Master 19 10%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Other 57 31%
Unknown 19 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 130 71%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 1%
Other 9 5%
Unknown 26 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2013.
All research outputs
#7,819,863
of 12,461,987 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#587
of 782 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,564
of 154,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,461,987 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 782 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 154,201 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them