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Validating the role of the Australian National University Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Index (ANU-ADRI) and a genetic risk score in progression to cognitive impairment in a population-based cohort of…

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, March 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
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Title
Validating the role of the Australian National University Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Index (ANU-ADRI) and a genetic risk score in progression to cognitive impairment in a population-based cohort of older adults followed for 12 years
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13195-017-0240-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shea J. Andrews, Ranmalee Eramudugolla, Jorge I. Velez, Nicolas Cherbuin, Simon Easteal, Kaarin J. Anstey

Abstract

The number of people living with dementia is expected to exceed 130 million by 2050, which will have serious personal, social and economic implications. Employing successful intervention and treatment strategies focused on disease prevention is currently the only available approach that can have an impact on the projected rates of dementia, with risk assessment being a key component of population-based risk reduction for identification of at-risk individuals. We evaluated a risk index comprising lifestyle, medical and demographic factors (the Australian National University Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index [ANU-ADRI]), as well as a genetic risk score (GRS), for assessment of the risk of progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The ANU-ADRI was computed for the baseline assessment of 2078 participants in the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life project. GRSs were constructed on the basis of 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants were assessed for clinically diagnosed MCI and dementia as well as psychometric test-based MCI (MCI-TB) at 12 years of follow-up. Multi-state models were used to estimate the odds of transitioning from cognitively normal (CN) to MCI, dementia and MCI-TB over 12 years according to baseline ANU-ADRI and GRS. A higher ANU-ADRI score was associated with increased risk of progressing from CN to both MCI and MCI-TB (HR 1.07 [95% CI 1.04-1.11]; 1.07 [1.04-1.09]). The GRS was associated with transitions from CN to dementia (HR 4.19 [95% CI 1.72-10.20), but not to MCI or MCI-TB (HR 1.05 [95% CI 0.86-1.29]; 1.03 [0.87-1.21]). Limitations of our study include that the ethnicity of participants in the PATH project is predominately Caucasian, potentially limiting the generalisability of the results of this study to people of other ethnicities. Biomarkers of AD were not available to define MCI attributable to AD. Not all the predictive variables for the ANU-ADRI were available in the PATH project. In the general population, the ANU-ADRI, comprising lifestyle, medical and demographic factors, is associated with the risk of progression from CN to MCI, whereas a GRS comprising the main AD risk genes was not associated with this risk. The ANU-ADRI may be used for population-level risk assessment and screening.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 79 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 15%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 22 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 16%
Neuroscience 8 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 25 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,407,219
of 9,176,636 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#201
of 416 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,282
of 253,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#10
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,176,636 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 416 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.6. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,539 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.