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Is it smoking or related lifestyle variables that increase metabolic syndrome risk?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Is it smoking or related lifestyle variables that increase metabolic syndrome risk?
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-11-196
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mikael Rabaeus, Patricia Salen, Michel de Lorgeril

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome is considered as mainly caused by a deleterious lifestyle (sedentarity and diet). That smoking contributes to metabolic syndrome had been suggested by several small studies and a meta-analysis. The interesting study by Slagter et al. published in BMC Medicine is the first very large study confirming this association in both genders, in all classes of body mass index, and in a dose-related manner. Surprisingly, smoking is even associated with increased abdominal fat. Rather than a direct causal effect of smoking, the reason for these associations is most probably the frequent presence of other lifestyle components in smokers. For example, physical inactivity and alcohol drinking are known to be more often present in smokers and could completely explain the observations of the Slagter et al. study. Unfortunately, these factors, already not properly checked in the first studies, were not assessed at all in the present one. However, as it is still on-going, we hope that other lifestyle factors will be included in future publications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 41%
Social Sciences 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Psychology 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2013.
All research outputs
#5,114,030
of 19,171,602 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#2,027
of 2,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,617
of 174,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,171,602 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,866 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.4. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 174,387 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them