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Variational modularity at the cell level: insights from the sperm head of the house mouse

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
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1 tweeter

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Title
Variational modularity at the cell level: insights from the sperm head of the house mouse
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-179
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nuria Medarde, Francesc Muñoz-Muñoz, María López-Fuster, Jacint Ventura

Abstract

Modularity is an important feature in the evolvability of organisms, since it allows the occurrence of complex adaptations at every single level of biological systems. While at the cellular level the modular organization of molecular interactions has been analyzed in detail, the phenotypic modularity (or variational modularity) of cell shape remains unexplored. The mammalian spermatozoon constitutes one of the most complex and specialized cell types found in organisms. The structural heterogeneity found in the sperm head suggests an association between its inner composition, shape and specificity of function. However, little is known about the extent of the connections between these features. Taking advantage of the house mouse sperm morphology, we analyzed the variational modularity of the sperm head by testing several hypotheses related to its structural and functional organization. Because chromosomal rearrangements can affect the genotype-phenotype map of individuals and thus modify the patterns of covariation between traits, we also evaluate the effect of Robertsonian translocations on the modularity pattern of the sperm head.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Serbia 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 18%
Environmental Science 2 9%
Computer Science 2 9%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2013.
All research outputs
#2,926,261
of 6,229,091 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,243
of 1,701 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,847
of 104,617 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#38
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,229,091 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,701 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 104,617 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.