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Canada and access to medicines in developing countries: intellectual property rights first

Overview of attention for article published in Globalization and Health, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Canada and access to medicines in developing countries: intellectual property rights first
Published in
Globalization and Health, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1744-8603-9-42
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joel Lexchin

Abstract

Canadian reports have recommended that health as a human right must be Canada's overarching global commitment and that the primacy of human rights should be prioritized over other elements of international law including international trade and investment law as it applies to access to pharmaceuticals. This paper uses a series of case reports to examine Canada's commitment to this goal. Specifically it examines cases where improved access has been in conflict with increased intellectual property rights. The 6 cases are: Canada's position when 39 pharmaceutical companies took South Africa to court in 1998 over its legislation to allow parallel importation of patented medicines and to regulate the price of medications; the stance that Canada took in the negotiations around the Doha Declaration in 2001; the passage of Canada's Access to Medicines Regime in 2004 and subsequent attempts to amend the legislation in 2011 and 2012; Canada's involvement in the final declaration at the United Nations High-Level meeting on non-communicable diseases in 2012; Canada's views about the terms in the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement as expressed in 2009; and Canada's 2013 position on the extension of the exemption for least developed countries from having to comply with the terms of the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement. In the first case Canada was neutral but in the remaining 5 cases Canada prioritized intellectual property rights over access. This position is consistent with how Canada has acted around domestic issues involving intellectual property rights for pharmaceutical products. Canada has supported strengthened rights despite the fact that their touted benefits have not been realized either domestically or in developing countries. As a result Canada has failed in its humanitarian duty to protect the human right to health in the form of safe and low cost medicines for the people in developing countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 61 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 24%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 12 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Arts and Humanities 3 5%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 14 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2013.
All research outputs
#2,530,378
of 19,404,461 outputs
Outputs from Globalization and Health
#431
of 980 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,117
of 174,739 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Globalization and Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,404,461 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 980 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 174,739 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them