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Mobile technology intervention to improve care coordination between HIV and substance use treatment providers: development, training, and evaluation protocol

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, March 2017
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1 tweeter

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10 Dimensions

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86 Mendeley
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Title
Mobile technology intervention to improve care coordination between HIV and substance use treatment providers: development, training, and evaluation protocol
Published in
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13722-017-0073-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kasey Claborn, Sara Becker, Susan Ramsey, Josiah Rich, Peter D. Friedmann

Abstract

People living with HIV (PLWH) with a substance use disorder (SUD) tend to receive inadequate medical care in part because of a siloed healthcare system in which HIV and substance use services are delivered separately. Ideal treatment requires an interdisciplinary, team-based coordinated care approach, but many structural and systemic barriers impede the integration of HIV and SUD services. The current protocol describes the development and preliminary evaluation of a care coordination intervention (CCI), consisting of a tablet-based mobile platform for HIV and SUD treatment providers, an interagency communication protocol, and a training protocol. We hypothesize that HIV and SUD treatment providers will find the CCI to be acceptable, and that after receipt of the CCI, providers will: exhibit higher retention in dual care among patients, report increased frequency and quality of communication, and report increased rates of relational coordination. A three phase approach is used to refine and evaluate the CCI. Phase 1 consists of in-depth qualitative interviews with 8 key stakeholders as well as clinical audits of participating HIV and SUD treatment agencies. Phase 2 contains functionality testing of the mobile platform with frontline HIV and SUD treatment providers, followed by refinement of the CCI. Phase 3 consists of a pre-, post-test trial with 30 SUD and 30 HIV treatment providers. Data will be collected at the provider, organization, and patient levels. Providers will complete assessments at baseline, immediately post-training, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months post-training. Organizational data will be collected at baseline, 1-, 3-, and 6-months post training, while patient data will be collected at baseline and 6-months post training. This study will develop and evaluate a CCI consisting of a tablet-based mobile platform for treatment providers, an interagency communication protocol, and a training protocol as a means of improving the integration of care for PLWH who have a SUD. Results have the potential to advance the field by bridging gaps in a fragmented healthcare system, and improving treatment efficiency, work flow, and communication among interdisciplinary providers from different treatment settings. NCT02906215.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 86 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 16%
Student > Master 14 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 21 24%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 15%
Psychology 8 9%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Computer Science 6 7%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 24 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2017.
All research outputs
#5,007,215
of 9,195,512 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#146
of 187 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,953
of 254,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,195,512 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 187 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,472 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.