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Sex-specific IL-6-associated signaling activation in ozone-induced lung inflammation

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, March 2016
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Title
Sex-specific IL-6-associated signaling activation in ozone-induced lung inflammation
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0069-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vikas Mishra, Susan L. DiAngelo, Patricia Silveyra

Abstract

Acute ozone (O3) exposure has known deleterious effects on the respiratory system and has been linked with respiratory disease and infection. Inflammatory lung disease induced by air pollution has demonstrated greater severity and poorer prognosis in women vs. men. Both severe damage to the bronchial-alveolar epithelium and malfunctioning of bronchial-blood barrier have been largely attributed to the pathobiology of O3-induced inflammatory response, but the associated mechanisms in the male and female lung remain unknown. Here, we investigated sex-based differential regulation of lung interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its downstream signaling pathways JAK2/STAT3 and AKT1/NF-κB in response to O3 exposure in a mouse model. We exposed male and female mice (in different stages of the estrous cycle) to 2 ppm of O3 or filtered air (FA) for 3 h, and we harvested lung tissue for protein expression analysis by Western blot. We found significant up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-6R in females and IL-6 in males in response to O3 vs. FA. Ozone exposure induced a significant increase in STAT3-Y705 phosphorylation in both females and males. Males exposed to O3 had decreased levels of JAK2, but increased JAK2 (Y1007+Y1008) phosphorylation, while females exposed to O3 showed significant up-regulation of both proteins. Both NF-κB (p105/p50) and AKT1 protein levels were significantly increased only in females exposed to O3. In addition, females exposed to O3 during proestrus displayed increased expression of selected genes when compared to females exposed to O3 in other estrous cycle stages. Together, our observations indicate a sex-based and estrous cycle-dependent differential lung inflammatory response to O3 and involvement of two converging JAK2/STAT3 and AKT1/NF-κB pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study specifically addressing the impact of the estrous cycle in O3-associated lung inflammatory pathways.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 8 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2017.
All research outputs
#5,030,504
of 9,232,980 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#118
of 165 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,949
of 254,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#8
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,232,980 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 165 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,715 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.