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Non-pharmacological interventions designed to reduce health risks due to unhealthy eating behaviour and linked risky or excessive drinking in adults aged 18–25 years: a systematic review protocol

Overview of attention for article published in Systematic Reviews, March 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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107 Mendeley
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Title
Non-pharmacological interventions designed to reduce health risks due to unhealthy eating behaviour and linked risky or excessive drinking in adults aged 18–25 years: a systematic review protocol
Published in
Systematic Reviews, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13643-017-0434-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott, S, Parkinson, K, Kaner, E, Robalino, S, Stead, M, Power, C, Fitzgerald, N, Wrieden, W, Adamson, A, Stephanie Scott, Kathryn Parkinson, Eileen Kaner, Shannon Robalino, Martine Stead, Christine Power, Niamh Fitzgerald, Wendy Wrieden, Ashley Adamson

Abstract

Excess body weight and heavy alcohol consumption are two of the greatest contributors to global disease. Alcohol use peaks in early adulthood. Alcohol consumption can also exacerbate weight gain. A high body mass index and heavy drinking are independently associated with liver disease but, in combination, they produce an intensified risk of damage, with individuals from lower socio-economic status groups disproportionately affected. We will conduct searches in MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, ASSIA, Web of Knowledge (WoK), Scopus, CINAHL via EBSCO, LILACS, CENTRAL and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses for studies that assess targeted preventative interventions of any length of time or duration of follow-up that are focused on reducing unhealthy eating behaviour and linked risky alcohol use in 18-25-year-olds. Primary outcomes will be reported changes in: (1) dietary, nutritional or energy intake and (2) alcohol consumption. We will include all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including cluster RCTs; randomised trials; non-randomised controlled trials; interrupted time series; quasi-experimental; cohort involving concurrent or historical controls and controlled before and after studies. Database searches will be supplemented with searches of Google Scholar, hand searches of key journals and backward and forward citation searches of reference lists of identified papers. Search records will be independently screened by two researchers, with full-text copies of potentially relevant papers retrieved for in-depth review against the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of RCTs will be evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Other study designs will be evaluated using the Cochrane Public Health Review Group's recommended Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. Studies will be pooled by meta-analysis and/or narrative synthesis as appropriate for the nature of the data retrieved. It is anticipated that exploration of intervention effectiveness and characteristics (including theory base, behaviour change technique; modality, delivery agent(s) and training of intervention deliverers, including their professional status; and frequency/duration of exposure) will aid subsequent co-design and piloting of a future intervention to help reduce health risk and social inequalities due to excess weight gain and alcohol consumption. PROSPERO CRD42016040128 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 22%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 19 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 21 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 20%
Psychology 17 16%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 27 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,017,577
of 9,207,038 outputs
Outputs from Systematic Reviews
#668
of 788 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,149
of 255,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Systematic Reviews
#37
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,207,038 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 788 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.