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Three steps to the immortality of cancer cells: senescence, polyploidy and self-renewal

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Cell International, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
115 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Three steps to the immortality of cancer cells: senescence, polyploidy and self-renewal
Published in
Cancer Cell International, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1475-2867-13-92
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jekaterina Erenpreisa, Mark S Cragg

Abstract

Metastatic cancer is rarely cured by current DNA damaging treatments, apparently due to the development of resistance. However, recent data indicates that tumour cells can elicit the opposing processes of senescence and stemness in response to these treatments, the biological significance and molecular regulation of which is currently poorly understood. Although cellular senescence is typically considered a terminal cell fate, it was recently shown to be reversible in a small population of polyploid cancer cells induced after DNA damage. Overcoming genotoxic insults is associated with reversible polyploidy, which itself is associated with the induction of a stemness phenotype, thereby providing a framework linking these separate phenomena. In keeping with this suggestion, senescence and autophagy are clearly intimately involved in the emergence of self-renewal potential in the surviving cells that result from de-polyploidisation. Moreover, subsequent analysis indicates that senescence may paradoxically be actually required to rejuvenate cancer cells after genotoxic treatments. We propose that genotoxic resistance is thereby afforded through a programmed life-cycle-like process which intimately unites senescence, polyploidy and stemness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Ukraine 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 103 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 28%
Researcher 21 20%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Student > Master 15 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Chemistry 4 4%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 11 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2013.
All research outputs
#11,956,453
of 21,347,686 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Cell International
#417
of 1,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,615
of 180,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Cell International
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,347,686 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,587 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 180,944 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them