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A clinical trial protocol to treat massive Africanized honeybee (Apis mellifera) attack with a new apilic antivenom

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, March 2017
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

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38 Mendeley
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Title
A clinical trial protocol to treat massive Africanized honeybee (Apis mellifera) attack with a new apilic antivenom
Published in
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40409-017-0106-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandre Naime Barbosa, Leslie Boyer, Jean-Philippe Chippaux, Natalia Bronzatto Medolago, Carlos Antonio Caramori, Ariane Gomes Paixão, João Paulo Vasconcelos Poli, Mônica Bannwart Mendes, Lucilene Delazari dos Santos, Rui Seabra Ferreira, Benedito Barraviera

Abstract

Envenomation caused by multiple stings from Africanized honeybees Apis mellifera constitutes a public health problem in the Americas. In 2015, the Brazilian Ministry of Health reported 13,597 accidents (incidence of seven cases per 100,000 inhabitants) with 39 deaths (lethality of 0.25%). The toxins present in the venom, which include melittin and phospholipase A2, cause lesions in diverse organs and systems that may be fatal. As there has been no specific treatment to date, management has been symptomatic and supportive only. In order to evaluate the safety and neutralizing capacity of a new apilic antivenom, as well as to confirm its lowest effective dose, a clinical protocol was developed to be applied in a multicenter, non-randomized and open phase I/II clinical trial. Twenty participants with more than five stings, aged more than 18 years, of both sexes, who have not previously received the heterologous serum against bee stings, will be included for 24 months. The proposed dose was based on the antivenom neutralizing capacity and the number of stings. Treatment will be administered only in a hospital environment and the participants will be evaluated for a period up to 30 days after discharge for clinical and laboratory follow-up. This protocol, approved by the Brazilian regulatory agencies for ethics (National Commission for Ethics on Research - CONEP) and sanitation (National Health Surveillance Agency - ANVISA), is a guideline constituted by specific, adjuvant, symptomatic and complementary treatments, in addition to basic orientations for conducting a clinical trial involving heterologous sera. This is the first clinical trial protocol designed specifically to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and safety of a new antivenom against stings from the Africanized honeybee Apis mellifera. The results will support future studies to confirm a new treatment for massive bee attack that has a large impact on public health in the Americas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 13%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 8 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Engineering 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 11 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2019.
All research outputs
#9,654,534
of 15,751,677 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#186
of 382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,564
of 262,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,751,677 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 382 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,296 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them