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Strong population genetic structuring in an annual fish, Nothobranchius furzeri, suggests multiple savannah refugia in southern Mozambique

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2013
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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59 Dimensions

Readers on

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94 Mendeley
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Title
Strong population genetic structuring in an annual fish, Nothobranchius furzeri, suggests multiple savannah refugia in southern Mozambique
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-196
Pubmed ID
Authors

Veronika Bartáková, Martin Reichard, Karel Janko, Matej Polačik, Radim Blažek, Kathrin Reichwald, Alessandro Cellerino, Josef Bryja

Abstract

Intraspecific genetic variation of African fauna has been significantly affected by pronounced climatic fluctuations in Plio-Pleistocene, but, with the exception of large mammals, very limited empirical data on diversity of natural populations are available for savanna-dwelling animals. Nothobranchius furzeri is an annual fish from south-eastern Africa, inhabiting discrete temporary savannah pools outside main river alluvia. Their dispersal is limited and population processes affecting its genetic structure are likely a combination of those affecting terrestrial and aquatic taxa. N. furzeri is a model taxon in ageing research and several populations of known geographical origin are used in laboratory studies. Here, we analysed the genetic structure, diversity, historical demography and temporal patterns of divergence in natural populations of N. furzeri across its entire distribution range.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 2 2%
United States 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 89 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 21%
Student > Master 16 17%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 21 22%
Unknown 9 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 54%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 21%
Environmental Science 6 6%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 10 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2013.
All research outputs
#8,032,440
of 12,807,611 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,842
of 2,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,850
of 157,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,807,611 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,413 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,797 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them