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Beak and skull shapes of human commensal and non-commensal house sparrows Passer domesticus

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Beak and skull shapes of human commensal and non-commensal house sparrows Passer domesticus
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-200
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sepand Riyahi, Øyvind Hammer, Tayebeh Arbabi, Antonio Sánchez, Cees S Roselaar, Mansour Aliabadian, Glenn-Peter Sætre

Abstract

The granivorous house sparrow Passer domesticus is thought to have developed its commensal relationship with humans with the rise of agriculture in the Middle East some 10,000 years ago, and to have expanded with the spread of agriculture in Eurasia during the last few thousand years. One subspecies, P. d. bactrianus, residing in Central Asia, has apparently maintained the ancestral ecology, however. This subspecies is not associated with human settlements; it is migratory and lives in natural grass- and wetland habitats feeding on wild grass seeds. It is well documented that the agricultural revolution was associated with an increase in grain size and changes in seed structure in cultivated cereals, the preferred food source of commensal house sparrow. Accordingly, we hypothesize that correlated changes may have occurred in beak and skull morphology as adaptive responses to the change in diet. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the skull shapes of 101 house sparrows from Iran, belonging to five different subspecies, including the non-commensal P. d. bactrianus, using geometric morphometrics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 20%
Student > Master 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 65%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 5%
Unspecified 2 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,106,226
of 17,188,187 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#273
of 2,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,360
of 174,409 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,188,187 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,797 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 174,409 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them