↓ Skip to main content

Neural circuitry at age 6 months associated with later repetitive behavior and sensory responsiveness in autism

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, March 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
169 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Neural circuitry at age 6 months associated with later repetitive behavior and sensory responsiveness in autism
Published in
Molecular Autism, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13229-017-0126-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason J. Wolff, Meghan R. Swanson, Jed T. Elison, Guido Gerig, John R. Pruett, Martin A. Styner, Clement Vachet, Kelly N. Botteron, Stephen R. Dager, Annette M. Estes, Heather C. Hazlett, Robert T. Schultz, Mark D. Shen, Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, Joseph Piven

Abstract

Restricted and repetitive behaviors are defining features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Under revised diagnostic criteria for ASD, this behavioral domain now includes atypical responses to sensory stimuli. To date, little is known about the neural circuitry underlying these features of ASD early in life. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 217 infants at high familial risk for ASD. Forty-four of these infants were diagnosed with ASD at age 2. Targeted cortical, cerebellar, and striatal white matter pathways were defined and measured at ages 6, 12, and 24 months. Dependent variables included the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised and the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire. Among children diagnosed with ASD, repetitive behaviors and sensory response patterns were strongly correlated, even when accounting for developmental level or social impairment. Longitudinal analyses indicated that the genu and cerebellar pathways were significantly associated with both repetitive behaviors and sensory responsiveness but not social deficits. At age 6 months, fractional anisotropy in the genu significantly predicted repetitive behaviors and sensory responsiveness at age 2. Cerebellar pathways significantly predicted later sensory responsiveness. Exploratory analyses suggested a possible disordinal interaction based on diagnostic status for the association between fractional anisotropy and repetitive behavior. Our findings suggest that restricted and repetitive behaviors contributing to a diagnosis of ASD at age 2 years are associated with structural properties of callosal and cerebellar white matter pathways measured during infancy and toddlerhood. We further identified that repetitive behaviors and unusual sensory response patterns co-occur and share common brain-behavior relationships. These results were strikingly specific given the absence of association between targeted pathways and social deficits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 169 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 167 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 21%
Student > Master 27 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 14%
Other 13 8%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Other 31 18%
Unknown 25 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 56 33%
Neuroscience 27 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 27 16%
Unknown 37 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2018.
All research outputs
#6,891,135
of 12,988,455 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#321
of 411 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,473
of 298,302 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#9
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,988,455 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 411 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.7. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,302 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.