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Age and the risk of All-Terrain Vehicle-related injuries in children and adolescents: a cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Age and the risk of All-Terrain Vehicle-related injuries in children and adolescents: a cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12887-017-0807-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lianne McLean, Kelly Russell, Steven McFaull, Lynne Warda, Milton Tenenbein, Jonathan McGavock

Abstract

The study was designed to determine if youth <16 years are at a greater risk of serious injuries related to all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use compared to older adolescents and adults. We performed cross sectional study of children and adults presenting to pediatric and adult emergency departments between 1990 and 2009 in Canada. The primary exposure variable was age <16 years and the primary outcome measure was moderate to serious injury determined from physician report of type and severity of injury. Among 5005 individuals with complete data, 58% were <16 years and 35% were admitted to hospital. The odds of a moderate to serious injury versus minor injury among ATV users <16 years of age was not different compared with those ≥16 years of age (OR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.06). After adjusting for era, helmet use, sex and driver status, youth <16 years were more likely to present with a head injury (aOR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.19-1.77) or fractures (aOR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.43-1.81), compared with those ≥16 years. Male participants (aOR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.06-1.38) and drivers (aOR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.12-1.51) were more likely to experience moderate or serious injuries than females and passengers. Helmet use was associated with significant protection from head injuries (aOR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.44-0.78). Youth under 16 years are at an increased risk of head injuries and fractures. For youth and adults presenting to emergency departments with an ATV-related injury, moderate to serious injuries associated with ATV use are more common among drivers and males. Helmet use protected against head injuries, suggesting minimum age limits for ATV use and helmet use are warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 12%
Other 3 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 10 29%
Unknown 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 10 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2018.
All research outputs
#4,651,256
of 15,920,653 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#853
of 2,007 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,753
of 268,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,920,653 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,007 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,202 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them