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Sleep disturbance and its associations with severity of dependence, depression and quality of life among heroin-dependent patients: a cross-sectional descriptive study

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Sleep disturbance and its associations with severity of dependence, depression and quality of life among heroin-dependent patients: a cross-sectional descriptive study
Published in
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13011-017-0101-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vincent Chin-Hung Chen, Hua Ting, Meng-Huan Wu, Tsang-Yaw Lin, Michael Gossop

Abstract

Sleep disturbance is common and may adversely affect treatment outcome, mental health, and quality of life in heroin-dependent patients. Previous studies have focused upon patients receiving treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study to explore the 1-month prevalence of sleep disturbance and its associations with socio-demographic, substance-related characteristics, severity of dependence, severity of depression, and quality of life among heroin-dependent patients before entering treatment program. The sample (n = 514) comprised individuals with heroin dependence attending the methadone maintenance treatment program and the therapeutic community at a psychiatric center in Nantou, Taiwan between 2008 and 2014. Sleep quality was measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) with a global score greater than 5 indicating sleep disturbance. Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Severity of Dependence Scale, and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF were also approached. T-test, chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regression were performed to measure associations between variables and sleep disturbance. The 1-month prevalence of sleep disturbance (PSQI > 5) was 76.3% among 514 subjects with heroin dependence. Heroin users with sleep disturbance had significantly more life events in the previous year, higher rate of unemployment, greater cigarette consumption, more substance related criminal convictions, longer length of heroin use, higher rate of injectors, greater severity of dependence, greater severity of depression, and lower quality of life compared to those without sleep disturbance. Severity of dependence, severity of depression, and physical health domain of quality of life remained significantly associated with sleep disturbance after adjusting for other variables. Heroin-dependent patients had a high 1-month prevalence of sleep disturbance, and this was associated with greater severity of dependence, greater severity of depression, and poorer physical health-related quality of life. Early assessments and interventions for sleep disturbance among patients with heroin dependence are recommended.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 16%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 2 3%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 18 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 21%
Psychology 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 22 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,473,442
of 11,192,687 outputs
Outputs from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#149
of 357 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,231
of 263,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#4
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,192,687 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 357 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,214 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.