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Exploration of pathways related to the decline in female circumcision in Egypt

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Exploration of pathways related to the decline in female circumcision in Egypt
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-921
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sepideh Modrek, Jenny X Liu

Abstract

There has been a large decline in female genital circumcision (FGC) in Egypt in recent decades. Understanding how this change has occurred so rapidly has been an area of particular interest to policymakers and public health officials alike who seek to further discourage the practice elsewhere. We document the trends in this decline in the newest cohorts of young girls and explore the influences of three pathways--socioeconomic development, social media messages, and women's empowerment--for explaining the observed trends. Using the 2005 and 2008 Egypt Demographic and Health Surveys, we estimate several logistic regression models to (1) examine individual and household determinants of circumcision, (2) assess the contributions of different pathways through which these changes may have occurred, and (3) assess the robustness of different pathways when unobserved community differences are taken into account. Across all communities, socioeconomic status, social media messages, and women's empowerment all have significant independent effects on the risk of circumcision. However, after accounting for unobserved differences across communities, only mother's education and household wealth significantly predict circumcision outcomes. Additional analyses of maternal education suggest that increases in women's education may be causally related to the reduction in FGC prevalence. Women's empowerment and social media appear to be more important in explaining differences across communities; within communities, socioeconomic status is a key driver of girls' circumcision risk. Further investigation of community-level women's educational attainment for mothers suggests that investments made in female education a generation ago may have had echo effects on girls' FGC risk a generation later.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 76 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Researcher 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 19 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 22%
Social Sciences 13 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 23 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 33. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2016.
All research outputs
#819,291
of 18,915,748 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#856
of 12,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,679
of 181,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,915,748 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,507 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 181,497 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.