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Exergames versus self-regulated exercises with instruction leaflets to improve adherence during geriatric rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, March 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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261 Mendeley
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Title
Exergames versus self-regulated exercises with instruction leaflets to improve adherence during geriatric rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12877-017-0467-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Oesch, Jan Kool, Luis Fernandez-Luque, Ellen Brox, Gunn Evertsen, Anton Civit, Roger Hilfiker, Stefan Bachmann

Abstract

Improving mobility in elderly persons is a primary goal in geriatric rehabilitation. Self-regulated exercises with instruction leaflets are used to increase training volume but adherence is often low. Exergames may improve adherence. This study therefore compared exergames with self-regulated exercise using instruction leaflets. The primary outcome was adherence. Secondary outcomes were enjoyment, motivation and balance during walking. Design: single center parallel group non-blinded randomized controlled trial with central stratified randomization. center for geriatric inpatient rehabilitation. Included were patients over 65 with mobility restrictions who were able to perform self-regulated exercise. Patients were assigned to self-regulated exercise using a) exergames on Windows Kinect® (exergame group EG) or b) instruction leaflets (conventional group CG). During two 30 min sessions physical therapists instructed self-regulated exercise to be conducted twice daily during thirty minutes during ten working days. Patients reported adherence (primary outcome), enjoyment and motivation daily. Balance during walking was measured blind before and after the treatment phase with an accelerometer. Analysis was by intention to treat. Repeated measures mixed models and Cohen's d effect sizes (ES, moderate if >0.5, large if > 0.8) with 95% CIs were used to evaluate between-group effects over time. Alpha was set at 0.05. From June 2014 to December 2015 217 patients were evaluated and 54 included, 26 in the EG and 28 in the CG. Adverse effects were observed in two patients in the EG who stopped because of pain during exercising. Adherence was comparable at day one (38 min. in the EG and 42 min. in the CG) and significantly higher in the CG at day 10 (54 min. in the CG while decreasing to 28 min. in the EG, p = 0.007, ES 0.94, 0.39-0.151). Benefits favoring the CG were also observed for enjoyment (p = 0.001, ES 0.88, 0.32 - 1.44) and motivation (p = 0.046, ES 0.59, 0.05-1.14)). There was no between-group effect in balance during walking. Self-regulated exercise using instruction leaflets is superior to exergames regarding adherence, enjoyment and motivation in a geriatric inpatient rehabilitation setting. Effects were moderate to large. There was no between group difference in balance during walking. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02077049 , 6 February 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 261 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 261 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 50 19%
Student > Bachelor 32 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 7%
Researcher 16 6%
Other 39 15%
Unknown 75 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 42 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 13%
Sports and Recreations 20 8%
Computer Science 13 5%
Social Sciences 11 4%
Other 47 18%
Unknown 94 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2017.
All research outputs
#3,029,587
of 22,710,079 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#768
of 3,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,410
of 308,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#14
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,710,079 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,145 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 308,437 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.