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Transcriptomic insights into the genetic basis of mammalian limb diversity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Transcriptomic insights into the genetic basis of mammalian limb diversity
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-0902-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer A. Maier, Marcelo Rivas-Astroza, Jenny Deng, Anna Dowling, Paige Oboikovitz, Xiaoyi Cao, Richard R. Behringer, Chris J. Cretekos, John J. Rasweiler, Sheng Zhong, Karen E. Sears

Abstract

From bat wings to whale flippers, limb diversification has been crucial to the evolutionary success of mammals. We performed the first transcriptome-wide study of limb development in multiple species to explore the hypothesis that mammalian limb diversification has proceeded through the differential expression of conserved shared genes, rather than by major changes to limb patterning. Specifically, we investigated the manner in which the expression of shared genes has evolved within and among mammalian species. We assembled and compared transcriptomes of bat, mouse, opossum, and pig fore- and hind limbs at the ridge, bud, and paddle stages of development. Results suggest that gene expression patterns exhibit larger variation among species during later than earlier stages of limb development, while within species results are more mixed. Consistent with the former, results also suggest that genes expressed at later developmental stages tend to have a younger evolutionary age than genes expressed at earlier stages. A suite of key limb-patterning genes was identified as being differentially expressed among the homologous limbs of all species. However, only a small subset of shared genes is differentially expressed in the fore- and hind limbs of all examined species. Similarly, a small subset of shared genes is differentially expressed within the fore- and hind limb of a single species and among the forelimbs of different species. Taken together, results of this study do not support the existence of a phylotypic period of limb development ending at chondrogenesis, but do support the hypothesis that the hierarchical nature of development translates into increasing variation among species as development progresses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 10 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,292,962
of 15,920,152 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#376
of 2,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,865
of 268,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,920,152 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,731 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,044 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them