↓ Skip to main content

Role of cholesterol in parasitic infections

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, May 2005
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
86 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Role of cholesterol in parasitic infections
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, May 2005
DOI 10.1186/1476-511x-4-10
Pubmed ID
Authors

Devendra Bansal, Harinderpal Singh Bhatti, Rakesh Sehgal

Abstract

The requirement of cholesterol for internalization of eukaryotic pathogens like protozoa (Leishmaniasis, Malaria and Toxoplasmosis) and the exchange of cholesterol along with other metabolites during reproduction in Schistosomes (helminths) under variable circumstances are poorly understood. In patients infected with some other helminthes, alterations in the lipid profile have been observed. Also, the mechanisms involved in lipid changes especially in membrane proteins related to parasite infections remain uncertain. Present review of literature shows that parasites induce significant changes in lipid parameters, as has been shown in the in vitro study where substitution of serum by lipid/cholesterol in medium and in experimental models (in vivo). Thus changes in lipid profile occur in patients having active infections with most of the parasites. Membrane proteins are probably involved in such reactions. All parasites may be metabolising cholesterol, but the exact relationship with pathogenic mechanism is not clear. So far, studies suggest that there may be some factors or enzymes, which allow the parasite to breakup and consume lipid/cholesterol. Further studies are needed for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in vivo. The present review analysis the various studies till date and the role of cholesterol in pathogenesis of different parasitic infections.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 2 2%
Switzerland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 101 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 26%
Researcher 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Master 11 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 7%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 11 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 9%
Chemistry 4 4%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 12 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2021.
All research outputs
#5,775,579
of 21,604,458 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#341
of 1,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,376
of 186,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,604,458 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,374 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,084 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them