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Oesophageal atresia

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
9 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
323 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
233 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Oesophageal atresia
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2007
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-2-24
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lewis Spitz

Abstract

Oesophageal atresia (OA) encompasses a group of congenital anomalies comprising of an interruption of the continuity of the oesophagus with or without a persistent communication with the trachea. In 86% of cases there is a distal tracheooesophageal fistula, in 7% there is no fistulous connection, while in 4% there is a tracheooesophageal fistula without atresia. OA occurs in 1 in 2500 live births. Infants with OA are unable to swallow saliva and are noted to have excessive salivation requiring repeated suctioning. Associated anomalies occur in 50% of cases, the majority involving one or more of the VACTERL association (vertebral, anorectal, cardiac, tracheooesophageal, renal and limb defects). The aetiology is largely unknown and is likely to be multifactorial, however, various clues have been uncovered in animal experiments particularly defects in the expression of the gene Sonic hedgehog (Shh). The vast majority of cases are sporadic and the recurrence risk for siblings is 1%. The diagnosis may be suspected prenatally by a small or absent stomach bubble on antenatal ultrasound scan at around 18 weeks gestation. The likelihood of an atresia is increased by the presence of polyhydramnios. A nasogastric tube should be passed at birth in all infants born to a mother with polyhydramnios as well as to infants who are excessively mucusy soon after delivery to establish or refute the diagnosis. In OA the tube will not progress beyond 10 cm from the mouth (confirmation is by plain X-ray of the chest and abdomen). Definitive management comprises disconnection of the tracheooesophageal fistula, closure of the tracheal defect and primary anastomosis of the oesophagus. Where there is a "long gap" between the ends of the oesophagus, delayed primary repair should be attempted. Only very rarely will an oesophageal replacement be required. Survival is directly related to birth weight and to the presence of a major cardiac defect. Infants weighing over 1500 g and having no major cardiac problem should have a near 100% survival, while the presence of one of the risk factors reduces survival to 80% and further to 30-50% in the presence of both risk factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 233 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 223 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 38 16%
Student > Postgraduate 35 15%
Other 25 11%
Student > Master 24 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 8%
Other 49 21%
Unknown 44 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 131 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 4%
Engineering 4 2%
Other 10 4%
Unknown 57 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2019.
All research outputs
#1,026,006
of 14,360,928 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#87
of 1,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,477
of 167,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#2
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,360,928 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,576 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 167,428 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.