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Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in infants study (IRIS) of hospitalized and non-ill infants aged <1 year in four countries: study design and methods

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
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Title
Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in infants study (IRIS) of hospitalized and non-ill infants aged <1 year in four countries: study design and methods
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2299-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark G. Thompson, Danielle R. Hunt, Ali K. Arbaji, Artan Simaku, Veronica L. Tallo, Holly M. Biggs, Carolyn Kulb, Aubree Gordon, Ilham Abu Khader, Silvia Bino, Marilla G. Lucero, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Pat Shifflett, Felix Sanchez, Basima I. Marar, Ilirjana Bakalli, Eric A. F. Simões, Min Z. Levine, Jennifer K. Meece, Angel Balmaseda, Tareq M. Al-Sanouri, Majlinda Dhimolea, Joanne N. de Jesus, Natalie J. Thornburg, Susan I. Gerber, Lionel Gresh

Abstract

This multi-country prospective study of infants aged <1 year aims to assess the frequency of influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections associated with hospitalizations, to describe clinical features and antibody response to infection, and to examine predictors of very severe disease requiring intensive care. We are enrolling a hospital-based cohort and a sample of non-ill infants in four countries (Albania, Jordan, Nicaragua, and the Philippines) using a common protocol. We are currently starting year 2 of a 2- to 3-year study and will enroll approximately 3,000 infants hospitalized for any acute illness (respiratory or non-respiratory) during periods of local influenza and/or RSV circulation. After informed consent and within 24 h of admission, we collect blood and respiratory specimens and conduct an interview to assess socio-demographic characteristics, medical history, and symptoms of acute illness (onset ≤10 days). Vital signs, interventions, and medications are documented daily through medical record abstraction. A follow-up health assessment and collection of convalescent blood occurs 3-5 weeks after enrollment. Influenza and RSV infection is confirmed by singleplex real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays. Serologic conversion will be assessed comparing acute and convalescent sera using hemagglutination inhibition assay for influenza antibodies and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for RSV. Concurrent with hospital-based enrollment, respiratory specimens are also being collected (and tested by rRT-PCR) from approximately 1,400 non-ill infants aged <1 year during routine medical or preventive care. The Influenza and RSV in Infants Study (IRIS) promises to expand our knowledge of the frequency, clinical features, and antibody profiles of serious influenza and RSV disease among infants aged <1 year, quantify the proportion of infections that may be missed by traditional surveillance, and inform decisions about the potential value of existing and new vaccines and other prevention and treatment strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Researcher 11 17%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Other 3 5%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 16 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 19 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2017.
All research outputs
#5,374,063
of 10,451,113 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,742
of 4,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,148
of 261,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#64
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,451,113 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,177 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,953 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.