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Cross-sectional analysis of health-related quality of life and elements of yoga practice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, January 2017
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Cross-sectional analysis of health-related quality of life and elements of yoga practice
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-1599-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gurjeet S. Birdee, Sujata G. Ayala, Kenneth A. Wallston

Abstract

Mind-body practices such as yoga have been studied for their generally positive effects on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The association between how a person practices yoga and the person's HRQOL is not known. Yoga practitioners were sent invitations to participate in an online survey via email. Yoga characteristics, HRQOL, and other sociodemographics were collected. Analyses of data from 309 consenting responders evaluated associations between yoga practice characteristics (use of yoga tools, length of practice, location, method, etc.) and the 10-item PROMIS Global Health scale for both physical and mental health components. Multivariable regression models demonstrated higher mental health scores were associated with regular meditation practice, higher income, and the method of practicing in a community group class (versus one-on-one). Higher physical health scores were associated with length of lifetime practice, teacher status, Krishnamacharya yoga style, and practicing in a yoga school/studio (versus at home). Meditation practice in yoga is positively associated with mental health. Length of lifetime yoga practice was significantly associated with better physical health, suggesting yoga has a potential cumulative benefit over time. Different locations and methods of practice may be associated with varying effects on health outcomes. Comparative cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the variations in yoga practice are needed to further characterize health benefits of yoga.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 22%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 18 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 15%
Psychology 10 11%
Sports and Recreations 7 8%
Social Sciences 7 8%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 24 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,459,225
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,230
of 2,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,842
of 261,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,512 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,210 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them