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Postprandial changes in cardiometabolic disease risk in young Chinese men following isocaloric high or low protein diets, stratified by either high or low meal frequency - a randomized controlled…

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, March 2016
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Title
Postprandial changes in cardiometabolic disease risk in young Chinese men following isocaloric high or low protein diets, stratified by either high or low meal frequency - a randomized controlled crossover trial
Published in
Nutrition Journal, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12937-016-0141-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Mok, Sumanto Haldar, Jetty Chung-Yung Lee, Melvin Khee-Shing Leow, Christiani Jeyakumar Henry

Abstract

Cardio-Metabolic Disease (CMD) is the leading cause of death globally and particularly in Asia. Postprandial elevation of glycaemia, insulinaemia, triglyceridaemia are associated with an increased risk of CMD. While studies have shown that higher protein intake or increased meal frequency may benefit postprandial metabolism, their combined effect has rarely been investigated using composite mixed meals. We therefore examined the combined effects of increasing meal frequency (2-large vs 6-smaller meals), with high or low-protein (40 % vs 10 % energy from protein respectively) isocaloric mixed meals on a range of postprandial CMD risk markers. In a randomized crossover study, 10 healthy Chinese males (Age: 29 ± 7 years; BMI: 21.9 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) underwent 4 dietary treatments: CON-2 (2 large Low-Protein meals), CON-6 (6 Small Low-Protein meals), PRO-2 (2 Large High-Protein meals) and PRO-6 (6 Small High-Protein meals). Subjects wore a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and venous blood samples were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals for 8.5 h to monitor postprandial changes in glucose, insulin, triglycerides and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Blood pressure was measured at regular intervals pre- and post- meal consumption. Urine was collected to measure excretion of creatinine and F2-isoprostanes and its metabolites over the 8.5 h postprandial period. The high-protein meals, irrespective of meal frequency were beneficial for glycaemic health since glucose incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for PRO-2 (185 ± 166 mmol.min.L(-1)) and PRO-6 (214 ± 188 mmol.min.L(-1)) were 66 and 60 % lower respectively (both p < 0.05), compared with CON-2 (536 ± 290 mmol.min.L(-1)). The iAUC for insulin was the lowest for PRO-6 (13.7 ± 7.1 U.min.L(-1)) as compared with CON-2 (28.4 ± 15.6 U.min.L(-)1), p < 0.001. There were no significant differences in postprandial responses in other measurements between the dietary treatments. The consumption of composite meals with higher protein content, irrespective of meal frequency appears to be beneficial for postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses in young, healthy Chinese males. Implications of this study may be useful in the Asian context where the consumption of high glycemic index, carbohydrate meals is prevalent. NCT02529228 .

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 98 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 16%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 22 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 29 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2017.
All research outputs
#8,025,864
of 9,259,051 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#912
of 960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,240
of 260,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#17
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,259,051 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.