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Microbiological, pathological and histological findings in four Danish pig herds affected by a new neonatal diarrhoea syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2013
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1 tweeter

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Microbiological, pathological and histological findings in four Danish pig herds affected by a new neonatal diarrhoea syndrome
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1746-6148-9-206
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hanne Kongsted, Beata Jonach, Svend Haugegaard, Øystein Angen, Sven E Jorsal, Branko Kokotovic, Lars E Larsen, Tim K Jensen, Jens P Nielsen

Abstract

Neonatal diarrhoea is a frequent clinical condition in commercial swine herds, previously regarded to be uncomplicated to treat. However, since 2008 it seems that a new neonatal diarrhoeic syndrome unresponsive to antibiotics and common management practices has emerged. Routine laboratory examinations have not detected any pathogen related to this syndrome. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate if well-known enteric pathogens could be associated with outbreaks of neonatal diarrhoea, thus question the hypotheses of a new syndrome. Furthermore, we wanted to evaluate macroscopic and microscopic findings associated with these outbreaks and if possible propose a preliminary piglet-level case-definition on syndrome New Neonatal Porcine Diarrhoea syndrome (NNPDS).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Austria 1 2%
Unknown 63 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Student > Master 8 12%
Other 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 26%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 18 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2013.
All research outputs
#2,015,241
of 3,632,299 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#308
of 609 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,354
of 95,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#24
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,632,299 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 609 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 95,077 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.