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Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2011
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Title
Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-9-105
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louiza Belkacemi, Andrea Jelks, Chun-Hung Chen, Michael G Ross, Mina Desai

Abstract

Maternal undernutrition (MUN) during pregnancy may lead to fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which itself predisposes to adult risk of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. IUGR may stem from insufficient maternal nutrient supply or reduced placental nutrient transfer. In addition, a critical role for maternal stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs) has been suggested to contribute to both IUGR and the ensuing risk of adult metabolic syndrome. While GC-induced fetal organ defects have been examined, there have been few studies on placental responses to MUN-induced maternal stress. Therefore, we hypothesize that 50% MUN associates with increased maternal GC levels and decreased placental HSD11B. This in turn leads to decreased placental and fetal growth, hence the need to investigate nutrient transporters. We measured maternal serum levels of corticosterone, and the placental basal and labyrinth zone expression of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B 1 (HSD11B-1) predominantly activates cortisone to cortisol and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11-DHC) to corticosterone, although can sometimes drive the opposing (inactivating reaction), and HSD11B-2 (only inactivates and converts corticosterone to 11-DHC in rodents) in control and MUN rats at embryonic day 20 (E20). Moreover, we evaluated the expression of nutrient transporters for glucose (SLC2A1, SLC2A3) and amino acids (SLC38A1, 2, and 4). Our results show that MUN dams displayed significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels compared to control dams. Further, a reduction in fetal and placental weights was observed in both the mid-horn and proximal-horn positions. Notably, the placental labyrinth zone, the site of feto-maternal exchange, showed decreased expression of HSD11B1-2 in both horns, and increased HSD11B-1 in proximal-horn placentas, but no change in NR3C1. The reduced placental GCs catabolic capacity was accompanied by downregulation of SLC2A3, SLC38A1, and SLC38A2 expression, and by increased SLC38A4 expression, in labyrinth zones from the mid- and proximal-horns. In marked contrast to the labyrinth zone, the basal zone, which is the site of hormone production, did not show significant changes in any of these enzymes or transporters. These results suggest that dysregulation of the labyrinth zone GC "barrier", and more importantly decreased nutrient supply resulting from downregulation of some of the amino acid system A transporters, may contribute to suboptimal fetal growth under MUN.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
India 1 1%
Unknown 70 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Researcher 13 18%
Student > Master 13 18%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 7 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Psychology 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 8 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2013.
All research outputs
#3,562,968
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#218
of 282 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,371
of 101,131 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#6
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 282 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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