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Disease severity determines health-seeking behaviour amongst individuals with influenza-like illness in an internet-based cohort

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
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Title
Disease severity determines health-seeking behaviour amongst individuals with influenza-like illness in an internet-based cohort
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2337-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Peppa, W. John Edmunds, Sebastian Funk

Abstract

Seasonal influenza epidemics place considerable strain on health services. Robust systems of surveillance are therefore required to ensure preparedness. Sentinel surveillance does not accurately capture the community burden of epidemics as it misses cases that do not present to health services. In this study, Flusurvey (an internet-based community surveillance tool) was used to examine how severity of disease influences health-seeking behaviour in the UK. Logistic regression with random effects was used to investigate the association between health-seeking and symptom severity, duration of illness and reduction in self-reported health-score over four flu seasons between 2011 and 2015. The majority of individuals did not seek care. In general, there was very strong evidence for an association between all severity indicators and visiting a health service (p < 0.0001). Being female (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.23-2.14, p = 0.0003) and a self-diagnosis of the flu (OR 3.39, 95% CI 2.38-4.83, p < 0.0001) were also associated with increased likelihood of visiting a health service. During the 2012-13 and 2014-15 flu seasons, there was a significantly larger proportion of individuals with more severe sets of symptoms and a longer duration of illness. Despite this, the proportion of individuals with particular sets of symptoms visiting a health service showed only very slight variation across years. Traditional surveillance systems capture only the more severe episodes of illness. However, in spite of variation in flu activity, the proportion of individuals visiting a health service remains relatively stable within specific sets of symptoms across years. These data could be used in combination with data on consultation rates to provide better estimates of community burden.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 10 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 15%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 7%
Psychology 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2017.
All research outputs
#902,065
of 9,673,602 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#287
of 4,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,067
of 261,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#16
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,673,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,115 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,266 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.