↓ Skip to main content

The role of the built environment in explaining educational inequalities in walking and cycling among adults in the Netherlands

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, March 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The role of the built environment in explaining educational inequalities in walking and cycling among adults in the Netherlands
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12942-017-0083-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniël C. van Wijk, Joost Oude Groeniger, Frank J. van Lenthe, Carlijn B. M. Kamphuis

Abstract

This study examined whether characteristics of the residential built environment (i.e. population density, level of mixed land use, connectivity, accessibility of facilities, accessibility of green) contributed to educational inequalities in walking and cycling among adults. Data from participants (32-82 years) of the 2011 survey of the Dutch population-based GLOBE study were used (N = 2375). Highest attained educational level (independent variable) and walking for transport, cycling for transport, walking in leisure time and cycling in leisure time (dependent variables) were self-reported in the survey. GIS-systems were used to obtain spatial data on residential built environment characteristics. A four-step mediation-based analysis with log-linear regression models was used to examine to contribution of the residential built environment to educational inequalities in walking and cycling. As compared to the lowest educational group, the highest educational group was more likely to cycle for transport (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.23), walk in leisure time (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.21), and cycle in leisure time (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.22). Objective built environment characteristics were related to these outcomes, but contributed minimally to educational inequalities in walking and cycling. On the other hand, compared to the lowest educational group, the highest educational group was less likely to walk for transport (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.82-1.01), which could partly be attributed to differences in the built environment. This study found that objective built environment characteristics contributed minimally to educational inequalities in walking and cycling in the Netherlands.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Lecturer 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 17 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 10 21%
Engineering 3 6%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 22 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2017.
All research outputs
#3,843,029
of 9,278,926 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#184
of 424 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,330
of 260,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,278,926 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 424 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,899 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.