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Strain-dependent mutational effects for Pepino mosaic virus in a natural host

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2017
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Title
Strain-dependent mutational effects for Pepino mosaic virus in a natural host
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-0920-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julia Minicka, Santiago F. Elena, Natasza Borodynko-Filas, Błażej Rubiś, Beata Hasiów-Jaroszewska

Abstract

Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging plant pathogen that infects tomatoes worldwide. Understanding the factors that influence its evolutionary success is essential for developing new control strategies that may be more robust against the evolution of new viral strains. One of these evolutionary factors is the distribution of mutational fitness effect (DMFE), that is, the fraction of mutations that are lethal, deleterious, neutral, and beneficial on a given viral strain and host species. The goal of this study was to characterize the DMFE of introduced nonsynonymous mutations on a mild isolate of PepMV from the Chilean 2 strain (PepMV-P22). Additionally, we also explored whether the fitness effect of a given mutation depends on the gene where it appears or on epistatic interactions with the genetic background. To address this latter possibility, a subset of mutations were also introduced in a mild isolate of the European strain (PepMV-P11) and the fitness of the resulting clones measured. A collection of 25 PepMV clones each containing a single nucleotide nonsynonymous substitution was created by site-directed mutagenesis and the fitness of each mutant was determined. PepMV-P22 genome showed a high degree of robustness against point mutations, with 80% of mutations being either neutral or even beneficial and only 20% being deleterious or lethal. We found that the effect of mutations strongly depended on the gene in which they were introduced. Mutations with the largest average beneficial effects were those affecting the RdRp gene, in contrast to mutations affecting TGB1 and CP genes, for which the average effects were deleterious. Moreover, significant epistatic interactions were observed between nonsynonymous mutations and the genetic background, meaning that the effect of a given nucleotide substitution on a particular genomic context cannot be predicted by knowing its effect in a different one. Our results indicated that PepMV genome has a surprisingly high robustness against mutations. We also found that fitness consequences of a given mutation differ between the two strains analyzed. This discovery suggests that the strength of selection, and thus the rates of evolution, vary among PepMV strains.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Master 3 12%
Professor 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 35%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2018.
All research outputs
#12,516,489
of 14,158,567 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,431
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Outputs of similar age
#225,517
of 263,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
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