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Treatment adherence and persistence with long-acting somatostatin analog therapy for the treatment of acromegaly: a retrospective analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, April 2017
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Title
Treatment adherence and persistence with long-acting somatostatin analog therapy for the treatment of acromegaly: a retrospective analysis
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40360-017-0124-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle H. Gurel, Yi Han, Andrea L. Stevens, Aaron Furtado, David Cox

Abstract

Many patients with acromegaly require medical treatment that includes somatostatin analogs (SSAs). Long-acting SSA formulations are widely used, due in part to increased patient convenience and increased treatment adherence vs daily medications. Although medication compliance can be poor in patients with chronic conditions, adherence and persistence with these SSAs in patients with acromegaly has not been evaluated. This analysis utilized claims data to estimate treatment adherence and persistence for lanreotide depot and long-acting octreotide in this population. This retrospective analysis used the MarketScan® database (~100 payors, 500 million claims in the US), which was searched between January 2007 and June 2012 to identify patients with acromegaly taking either lanreotide depot or long-acting octreotide. Patients switching treatments were excluded. Treatment adherence was assessed using medication possession ratio (MPR; number of doses dispensed in relation to dispensing period; ≥80% is considered adherent), injection count, and treatment time. Persistence was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox proportional hazards modeling. A washout period, defined as no acromegaly-related prescription activity 180 days prior to the index date, was employed to minimize effects of prior therapy and focus on patients more likely to be treatment-naïve. Altogether 1308 patients with acromegaly receiving a single SSA for treatment (1127 octreotide, 181 lanreotide) who had not switched treatments were identified. Mean MPR in patients with a 180-day washout (n = 663) was 89% for those receiving octreotide (n = 545) and 87% for those receiving lanreotide (n = 118). Median number of days on therapy was 169 (95% CI 135-232) for octreotide patients and 400 (95% CI 232-532) for lanreotide patients. The point estimate of the Cox proportional hazard ratio for stopping treatment was 1.385 for octreotide vs lanreotide (95% CI 1.079-1.777), suggesting a 38.5% increased risk for stopping octreotide before lanreotide. Treatment adherence was similarly good for both injectable SSA treatments studied, at 87% or greater. Persistence was greater with lanreotide than octreotide and the risk of discontinuing therapy was lower with lanreotide than octreotide. Further studies to determine factors leading to these differences in persistence or to predict discontinuation of therapy may aid in clinical management of these patients.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 35%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Professor 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 38%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,547,937
of 9,792,785 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#174
of 233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,374
of 263,117 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,792,785 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 233 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,117 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.