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Option B+ for prevention of vertical HIV transmission has no influence on adverse birth outcomes in a cross-sectional cohort in Western Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, March 2017
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136 Mendeley
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Title
Option B+ for prevention of vertical HIV transmission has no influence on adverse birth outcomes in a cross-sectional cohort in Western Uganda
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1263-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eva M. Rempis, Alexandra Schnack, Sarah Decker, Vera Braun, John Rubaihayo, Nazarius Mbona Tumwesigye, Priscilla Busingye, Gundel Harms, Stefanie Theuring

Abstract

While most Sub-Saharan African countries are now implementing the WHO-recommended Option B+ protocol for prevention of vertical HIV transmission, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the influence of Option B+ exposure on adverse birth outcomes (ABOs). Against this background, we assessed ABOs among delivering women in Western Uganda. A cross-sectional, observational study was performed within a cohort of 412 mother-newborn-pairs in Virika Hospital, Fort Portal in 2013. The occurrence of stillbirth, pre-term delivery, and small size for gestational age (SGA) was analysed, looking for influencing factors related to HIV-status, antiretroviral drug exposure and duration, and other sociodemographic and clinical parameters. Among 302 HIV-negative and 110 HIV-positive women, ABOs occurred in 40.5%, with stillbirth in 6.3%, pre-term delivery in 28.6%, and SGA in 12.2% of deliveries. For Option B+ intake (n = 59), no significant association was found with stillbirth (OR 0.48, p = 0.55), pre-term delivery (OR 0.97, p = 0.92) and SGA (OR 1.5, p = 0.3) compared to seronegative women. Women enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART) before conception (n = 38) had no different risk for ABOs than women on Option B+ or HIV-negative women. Identified risk factors for stillbirth included lack of formal education, poor socio-economic status, long travel distance, hypertension and anaemia. Pre-term delivery risk was increased with poor socio-economic status, primiparity, Malaria and anaemia. The occurrence of SGA was influenced by older age and Malaria. In our study, women on Option B+ showed no difference in ABOs compared to HIV-negative women and to women on ART. We identified several non-HIV/ART-related influencing factors, suggesting an urgent need for improving early risk assessment mechanisms in antenatal care through better screening and triage systems. Our results are encouraging with regard to continued universal scale-up of Option B+ and ART programmes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Unknown 135 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 25%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 11%
Researcher 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 36 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 19%
Social Sciences 7 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 40 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2017.
All research outputs
#5,215,520
of 9,424,035 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,407
of 1,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,088
of 261,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#44
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,424,035 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,882 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.