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Methods for conceptualising ‘visual ability’ as a measurable construct in children with cerebral palsy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Research Methodology, March 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Methods for conceptualising ‘visual ability’ as a measurable construct in children with cerebral palsy
Published in
BMC Medical Research Methodology, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12874-017-0316-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Belinda Deramore Denver, Margareta Adolfsson, Elspeth Froude, Peter Rosenbaum, Christine Imms

Abstract

Vision influences functioning and disability of children with cerebral palsy, so there is a growing need for psychometrically robust tools to advance assessment of children's vision abilities in clinical practice and research. Vision is a complex construct, and in the absence of clarity about this construct it is challenging to know whether valid, reliable measures exist. This study reports a method for conceptualising 'visual ability' as a measurable construct. Using the items from 19 assessment tools previously identified in a systematic review, this study used a two-phase process: first, deductive content analysis linked items to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Child and Youth version (ICF-CY), and second, vision-specific 'Activity'-level items were explored using inductive thematic analysis. The linking and content analysis identified that existing assessment tools are measuring vision across the ICF-CY domains of Body Functions, Activities and Participation, and Environmental and Personal Factors. Items specifically coded to vision at the Activity level were defined as measuring 'how vision is used', and these items form the basis of the conceptualisation that 'visual ability' is measurable as a single construct. The thematic analysis led to the identification of 3 categories containing 13 themes that reflect a child's observable visual behaviours. Seven abilities reflect how a child uses vision: responds or reacts, initiates, maintains or sustains looking, changes or shifts looking, searches, locates or finds, and follows. Four interactions reflect the contexts in which a child uses their vision to purposefully interact: watches and visually interacts with people and faces, objects, over distance, and with hands. Finally, two themes reflect a child's overall use of vision in daily activities: frequency of use, and efficiency of use. This study demonstrates an approach to exploring and explaining a complex topic utilising World Health Organization language and building on existing research. Despite the complexity of vision, the concept of 'how vision is used' can be clearly defined as a measurable construct at the Activity level of the ICF-CY. This study has identified observable visual behaviours that may be developed into items assessing how vision is used in daily activities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 66 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Other 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Professor 4 6%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 16 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Psychology 9 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Neuroscience 3 4%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 21 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2017.
All research outputs
#4,238,019
of 15,920,152 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#659
of 1,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,111
of 268,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,920,152 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,497 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,299 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them