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Myasthenia gravis

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, November 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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134 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
258 Mendeley
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Title
Myasthenia gravis
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, November 2007
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-2-44
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vern C Juel, Janice M Massey

Abstract

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare, autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder. Contemporary prevalence rates approach 1/5,000. MG presents with painless, fluctuating, fatigable weakness involving specific muscle groups. Ocular weakness with asymmetric ptosis and binocular diplopia is the most typical initial presentation, while early or isolated oropharyngeal or limb weakness is less common. The course is variable, and most patients with initial ocular weakness develop bulbar or limb weakness within three years of initial symptom onset. MG results from antibody-mediated, T cell-dependent immunologic attack on the endplate region of the postsynaptic membrane. In patients with fatigable muscle weakness, the diagnosis of MG is supported by: 1. pharmacologic testing with edrophonium chloride that elicits unequivocal improvement in strength; 2. electrophysiologic testing with repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) studies and/or single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) that demonstrates a primary postsynaptic neuromuscular junctional disorder; and 3. serologic demonstration of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) or muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies. Differential diagnosis includes congenital myasthenic syndromes, Lambert Eaton syndrome, botulism, organophosphate intoxication, mitochondrial disorders involving progressive external ophthalmoplegia, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), motor neuron disease, and brainstem ischemia. Treatment must be individualized, and may include symptomatic treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors and immune modulation with corticosteroids, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Rapid, temporary improvement may be achieved for myasthenic crises and exacerbations with plasma exchange (PEX) or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Owing to improved diagnostic testing, immunotherapy, and intensive care, the contemporary prognosis is favorable with less than five percent mortality and nearly normal life expectancy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 258 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 2%
United States 3 1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 243 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 54 21%
Researcher 31 12%
Other 27 10%
Student > Postgraduate 26 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 7%
Other 57 22%
Unknown 46 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 123 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 3%
Social Sciences 8 3%
Other 34 13%
Unknown 52 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2022.
All research outputs
#3,048,743
of 21,761,312 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#402
of 2,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,022
of 208,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#16
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,761,312 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,465 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,640 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.