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Back to the basics: identifying positive youth development as the theoretical framework for a youth drug prevention program in rural Saskatchewan, Canada amidst a program evaluation

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
160 Mendeley
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Title
Back to the basics: identifying positive youth development as the theoretical framework for a youth drug prevention program in rural Saskatchewan, Canada amidst a program evaluation
Published in
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, October 2013
DOI 10.1186/1747-597x-8-36
Pubmed ID
Authors

Colleen Anne Dell, Charles Randy Duncan, Andrea DesRoches, Melissa Bendig, Megan Steeves, Holly Turner, Terra Quaife, Chuck McCann, Brett Enns

Abstract

Despite endorsement by the Saskatchewan government to apply empirically-based approaches to youth drug prevention services in the province, programs are sometimes delivered prior to the establishment of evidence-informed goals and objectives. This paper shares the 'preptory' outcomes of our team's program evaluation of the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services' Outreach Worker Service (OWS) in eight rural, community schools three years following its implementation. Before our independent evaluation team could assess whether expectations of the OWS were being met, we had to assist with establishing its overarching program goals and objectives and 'at-risk' student population, alongside its alliance with an empirically-informed theoretical framework.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Unknown 159 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 22%
Researcher 22 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 32 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 33 21%
Social Sciences 32 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 8%
Arts and Humanities 4 3%
Other 15 9%
Unknown 39 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2015.
All research outputs
#2,837,705
of 16,252,997 outputs
Outputs from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#185
of 529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,910
of 189,184 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#11
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,252,997 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,184 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.